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2019 APG Professional Management Conference

 

APG's Professional Management Conference offers three full days of presentations designed specifically for genealogical professionals.

Note: Select presentations at the 2019 PMC will be recorded.

Hotel

The 2019 APG PMC will be held at the Hotel RL (formerly the Red Lion), 161 W. 600 S., in Salt Lake City, Utah. The conference rate is $109.26 per night. The hotel will honor the rate for three days before and three days after the conference. The rate also includes free parking (normally $10 per night) for those staying at the hotel.

Make your reservation at https://www.redlion.com/create-booking?property=6121&type=group&code=AOPG2019&redirect=property&start=2019-09-13&end=2019-09-25

Airport Transportation

The hotel has a complimentary airport shuttle.

 

Program Schedule -- 2019 PMC

Wednesday, 18 September 2019

1:00–5:00 pm Tour–Behind the Scenes at the Family History Library
Pre-registration required. Brought to you by the Utah Valley APG Chapter.
FULL - no further registrations accepted
5:30–7:00 pm BCG Portfolios and ICAPGEN Projects Available
Outside Wasatch 1/2
7:00–9:00 pm Registration and Welcome Reception
Hosted by Ancestry ProGenealogists at their offices, 324 South State, Suite 100

 

Thursday through Saturday: Visit with Our Sponsors in the Hall Outside the Wasatch Rooms

 

Thursday, 19 September 2019

NOTE: Keynote, opening session, and all presentations in Wasatch 3 will be recorded.

8:00 - 9:00 am Outside Wasatch 1/2
Registration
9:00 - 10:15 am Wasatch 1/2
Conference Welcome & APG Awards
Billie Stone Fogarty, MEd, APG President

Keynote: Improving Our Success Rate in Solving Client Problems
Elizabeth Shown Mills, CG®, CGL, FASG
Problem-solving does not mean “finding a document that answers the client’s question.” No problem is solved—no question is answered—by a single “find.” Reliable solutions may, in fact, leave us with no one document that explicitly answers the research question. This session explores three critical stages: initial communication; problem analysis and project planning; and execution and reporting of research. For each stage, it lays out strategies developed by the presenter across four decades as a professional researcher—strategies that will improve your success rate, your client satisfaction, your reputation as a professional, and the financial viability of your career.
10:15 - 10:45 am Break (1/2 hour)
  Cascade 1/2/3
First Floor
Avenue 1/2
13th Floor
Wasatch 3
First Floor
RECORDING
10:45 am - 12:00 pm Genetic Genealogy Mystery Escape Room
Paul Woodbury
You and your colleagues have been trapped in the basement of the Family History Library after hours. Work together to solve a real genetic genealogy case, unlock clues, obtain keys and codes and ultimately solve the case. Students will work to correlate all evidence in order to escape and will need to apply many principles common to genetic genealogy practice and methodology.
Writing About Special Concerns
Michael J. Leclerc, CG®
We frequently find variations on the typical family in our research. Modern technology accounts for some, but others are timeless. It is important that we handle these situations sensitively, carefully, and impartially. This is true whether we are writing client reports or writing family narratives for ourselves or others. Perhaps one of our biggest challenges in client research is handling topics that may cause some people concern. Family secrets have the power to cause emotional distress even decades or a century later. But we are ethically bound not to obfuscate or hide the truth for the sake of not hurting someone’s feelings. This presentation will discuss some potential areas of concern, and how we can handle them in our reports and other writings.
Can I Really Make Money as a Professional Genealogist?
Melissa Johnson, CG®
The answer is yes! But business skills are the key to success. Learn about how to set up a genealogy business for success and refine an existing business to become more profitable. The lecture will cover the fundamentals of setting up a genealogy business, including a readiness check, the key components of a business plan, marketing strategies, and a plan for profitability. For those already operating a genealogy business, a plan for analyzing time spent on activities and refining goals for the future will be covered.
12:00 - 12:15 pm Break (15 minutes)
12:15 - 1:45 pm Wasatch 1/2
Lunch, pre-registration required
Being Solo - Self-care for the Ups and Downs
Janice Lovelace, PhD
Most professional genealogists work in a solo practice. It can be rewarding and demanding. How do you take care of yourself as you balance the demands of everyday life and your genealogical work? This presentation will help you develop strategies to improve self-care. Learn how to balance family and work demands to effectively be the best professional you can.
Outside Wasatch 1/2
BCG Portfolios and ICAPGEN Projects Available
1:45 - 2:00 pm Break (15 minutes)
2:00 - 3:15 pm Guion Miller and Your Ancestors Who Claimed to be Cherokee, But Are Not
J. Mark Lowe, CG®, FUGA
Many record sets are far more useful beyond their basic information data. The collection, Records Related to Enrollment of Eastern Cherokee, details the applications for consideration of government funds eligible under the treaties of 1835-36 and 1845 between the United States, the Eastern Cherokee, and the Court of Claims. The applications typically include extensive family information. Learn how these might be used even when there is no Cherokee connection. Examples of the variety of applications and how to access them will be shared. This record set is especially helpful with all families who migrated out of Maryland, Virginia, and the Carolinas (including African American and those with no Cherokee connection).
Productivity Hacks for Professional Genealogists
Melissa Johnson, CG®
The lecture will cover concepts related to simplifying administrative tasks for professional genealogists. The use of time tracking apps to track time spent on client work, administrative work, volunteer commitments, travel and other tasks will be covered, as well as how to analyze the data to refine your genealogy business and become more profitable. Several invoicing platforms for online invoicing and payment collection will be discussed, as will several types of project management software. The pros and cons of online bookkeeping and bookkeeping services, as well as the use of subcontractors and personal assistants, will also be covered.
Creating Genetic Networks with DNA Match Clustering–The Leeds Method and Automated Adaptations
Dana Leeds
The world of genetic genealogy is quickly changing. In the summer of 2018, I developed the Leeds method for creating genetic networks from DNA cousin matches. A brief overview of how to create genetic networks using both manual and automated methods will be demonstrated. Next, analysis of genetic networks will be used to identify clusters stressing the importance of building reverse trees and adding all known DNA cousins. After the clusters are identified, they can be specifically targeted to work on brick walls, biological parents, or even reveal unexpected surprises. Case studies will be used to demonstrate all three primary outcomes.
3:15 - 3:45 pm Break (1/2 hour)
3:45 - 5:00 pm Genetic Genealogy Case Studies: Choose Your Own Adventure
Paul Woodbury
See genetic genealogy in practice from start to finish. See evaluation of shared DNA, analysis of different inheritance patterns, corroboration of genetic and traditional evidence, application of triangulation, genetic networks, chromosome mapping, DNA collaboration and consideration of coverage in practice. Participate in audience polling to choose your own adventure from a set of available case studies and success stories from around the world. Discuss your learning and apply the principles you observe to your own research cases.
ABCs of Accounting for Your Genealogy Business
Mary Kircher Roddy, CPA
P and L. Balance sheet. Debits. Credits. 1099. W-9. What does it all mean??? Learn the basics of setting up and maintaining an accounting system for your genealogy business. Should you have a sole-proprietorship or something else? What kinds of records and documents do you need to keep and for how long? What kinds of expenses can you deduct? What kind of accounting software do you need? What about paying your taxes? How can you tell if you’re making any money at this business? All these issues and more will be covered.
Knowing Your SEO from your SMO: A Genealogists Guide to Digital Marketing
David Ryan, MA, DIPGEN
The advent of digital marketing has changed how we connect with potential clients and other professionals. But how many of us can offer a firm explanation for what digital marketing is? How often do we let ourselves get confused and bewildered by all the jargon and terminology? What effective strategies are there for making the most of digital marketing resources such as websites, social media and search engines? The purpose of this presentation is to examine just how digital technologies have changed our approach to marketing and how we can take advantage of this without breaking the bank.
5:00 - 6:00 pm Wasatch 1/2
Door Prizes, APG Annual Meeting, Refreshments sponsored by Ancestry ProGenealogists
Must be present to win prizes
6:00 - 7:00 pm Outside Wasatch 1/2
Poster Sessions Description

Know Your Neighbors: Mexico and Latin America from a Genealogical Perspective
Nefi Arenas Salazar

Finding a Balance: Working as a Professional Genealogist and Having a Life
Pamela Guye Holland

The Process of Creating an Instructional Video
Shaunese Luthy

Polynesian Oral Histories: Researching and Preserving Our People
Miyamoto Loretta Jensen

If the Walls Could Talk: The Value of Oral History for Genealogy
David Ryan

Using 1821 Census Fragments to Reconstruct an Irish Town
Steven W. Morrison

Free and Inexpensive Resources to Grow Your Business Skills
Lauri Jean Swett

 

Friday, 20 September 2019

8:00 - 9:00 am Wasatch 1/2
Continental Breakfast Compliments of APG and Legacy Tree Genealogists

Outside Wasatch 1/2
Registration
9:00 - 10:15 am Wasatch 1/2
Opening Session: Marketing Genealogy to New Audiences: Lessons from the Life and Growth of ProGenealogists
Kory L. Meyerink, MLS, AG, FUGA
How did three part-time genealogists build a million dollar research business in under a decade? It took work, but it’s not a secret, and you can do it too! Your market is bigger than the hobby genealogist! Here are five things you need to know to develop your research business and become the next million dollar research company!
10:15 - 10:45 am Break (1/2 hour)
  Cascade 1/2/3
First Floor
Avenue 1/2
13th Floor
Wasatch 3
First Floor
RECORDING
10:45 am - 12:00 pm Networking Workshop
Mary Eberle, JD
Do you ever find yourself wanting to refer someone to another genealogist? Wish you knew one or two people, but you’re stumped? In this workshop, attendees will build their referral network by exchanging information about their businesses and areas of expertise. The exchange will occur in a "speed networking" setting with time provided for sequential 1:1 interactions. During an interaction, participants will share their genealogy specialty and background. Shared information and exchanged business cards can then serve as a resource for future referrals to other professional genealogists.
Panel: Beyond Solo: Growing Your Business
Jessica Taylor, Fiona Fitzsimons, Catherine Desmarais, CG®
If you’ve thought about transitioning from a solo genealogist to managing a team of genealogists, or are curious about what that would be like, come hear from genealogy industry small business owners as they describe their journeys and what they’ve learned through both challenge and triumph. This panel presentation will feature Fiona Fitzsimons, co-founder and Research Director of Eneclann Ltd., Jessica M. Taylor, founder and president of Legacy Tree Genealogists, Inc., and Catherine Wiest Desmarais, CG®, founder and manager of Stone House Historical Research. Time for Q&A will be included.
Government for the People: Leveraging Freedom of Information Laws to Procure Novel Records
Alec Ferretti
This lecture will explain how state and federal Freedom of Information laws work, and what genealogists can and cannot accomplish with them. Alec will discuss governments’ hesitations to provide genealogists with documents to which they are legally entitled, and the tools we have to plead our cases. The nuances of different jurisdictions’ procedures will be outlined, and case studies will be cited in which pursuing FOI compliance resulted in agencies releasing millions of public records to the substantial benefit of the genealogical community, along with specific records to the benefit of a particularly genealogical question.
12:00 - 12:15 pm Break (15 minutes)
12:15 - 1:45 pm Wasatch 1/2
Lunch, pre-registration required
40th Anniversary Celebration: Recognizing our Charter Members
David McDonald, DMin, CG®, APG Vice President, Host
Outside Wasatch 1/2
BCG Portfolios and ICAPGEN Projects Available
1:45 - 2:00 pm Break (15 minutes)
2:00 - 3:15 pm Help Me Find My People: Advanced Techniques for Finding Enslaved Individuals
Kenyatta D. Berry, JD
One of the major challenges of African American genealogy is finding enslaved individuals. Slavery was the foundation of America’s economic system and shaped laws at the federal and state level. To find enslaved individuals and reconnect family units, professional genealogists must go beyond the traditional research resources. Understanding the history of slave trading, slave resistance, and reconstruction will broaden the professional’s knowledge of the record sets available to "help me find my people."
Unpacking the Bag: The Tricks and Tools of a Traveling Historian
Benjamin Hollister
Australia is a big country. The next major city to Adelaide is 700 kilometers away, followed by one 1000 kilometers away. This ends up requiring researchers in Australia to either travel a lot or use technology to access records. But many of the same issues can be met simply by spending time at a local archives or library: making sure you have the correct app and correct device, that everything will connect, and that you don’t need a pack-horse to carry everything. This presentation explores one researcher’s “go-bag” of devices and software.
Understand How to Develop Compiled Statistical Data When Only the Question Exists
J. Mark Lowe, CG®, FUGA
As a professional, you are often called upon to answer or analyze a question when a clear reference does not exist to provide the summary data. Understand how we can build the answer from existing data.
3:15 - 3:30 pm Break (15 minutes)
3:30 - 5:00 pm Roundtable: Diversifying Your Talents to Build a Better Business
Katherine R. Willson
Professional genealogists have the knowledge and skills to create businesses expanding beyond traditional pedigree research. We will discuss options for casting a wider net for additional income opportunities. Specific discussions will involve possible income streams within the genealogical field; options for promoting name recognition; the costs for establishing a business in these fields; and considerations for deciding which of these options are the best fit for you.
Roundtable: Certification: The Line Between Pass and Fail
Judy G. Russell, JD, CG®, CGL
Each year, dozens of genealogists apply to the Board for Certification of Genealogists (BCG) in an effort to achieve certification. Of those who apply, only about 40 percent succeed. But genealogy isn’t rocket science. There is plenty of information out there to explain the process and the applicable standards. Passing portfolios are available for review at national conferences and institutes. So what happened—what went wrong—in the roughly 60 percent that didn’t make it? Where is the line between pass and fail?
Roundtable: Navigating Difficult Situations Related to DNA Testing
Mary Eberle, JD
Professional genealogists providing DNA services can find themselves enveloped in difficult and emotionally charged situations. We might need to deliver unexpected or unwelcomed findings to clients. Or maybe they found us because they just learned that their father isn’t their biological father or that they were lied to about their family. This work can be challenging. Yet, few of us have any training in handling these situations. This interactive class will explore how to navigate these situations and best serve our clients. The audience will be invited to provide ideas, strategies, and resources to address a set of hypothetical situations.
5:15 - 6:00 pm Discussion Groups Description

Cascade 1/2/3
Secrets of Becoming an Institute Course Coordinator
Elissa Scalise Powell, CG®, CGL; Karen Molohon, MSEd, MS; Peg Ivanyo

Wasatch 1/2
Autosomal to X, Y, and Z: Prioritization of Genetic Genealogy Methodologies in Your Research Plan
Paul Woodbury

Avenue 1/2
Young Bloods: Bringing the Rising Generation into Family History
Miyamoto Loretta Jensen

Wasatch 3
Excellence in Education: What it Takes to be an Effective Genealogical Educator
Daniel Earl

 

Saturday, 21 September 2019

8:00 - 9:00 am Outside Wasatch 1/2
Registration
9:00 - 10:15 am Wasatch 1/2
Opening Session: Past, Present, Future: Records Access as a Genealogical Imperative
Judy G. Russell, JD, CG®, CGL
Open and free access to relevant records—to the maximum extent possible under the law and ethical norms of the field—is critical to the genealogical community. Yet records access and availability are under attack throughout the United States and abroad, often in the name of fighting identity theft. Only the most diligent efforts to protect access to the records of our past by a committed community in the present will allow us to protect our genealogical interests into the future.
10:15 - 10:45 am Break (1/2 hour)
  Cascade 1/2/3
First Floor
Avenue 1/2
13th Floor
Wasatch 3
First Floor
RECORDING
10:45 am - 12:00 pm Strategies to Analyze Endogamous DNA
Alec Ferretti
This lecture will discuss how best to weed out false-positive DNA matches that test takers from endogamous groups face daily. Alec will outline the data (both peer-reviewed and crowd-sourced) that demonstrates the unique ways in which endogamous populations match each other. Then, by using visualizations at RootsFinder, DNA Painter, and Genetic Affairs, he will illustrate webs of interrelationships of endogamous test-takers and identify genetic pile-up regions. Although there is no surefire method as of yet to remove false matches, having a better understanding of endogamy can help us better analyze match data.
Sinking of the Titanic, the Tennessee Girl Who Ate a Snake, and the Spirit Who Frightened Andrew Jackson: Testing Outrageous Family Stories
J. Mark Lowe, CG®, FUGA
We all face stories that require our attention. Excellent researchers need to rise above the surface to cut through stories, comparing resources, and formulating an improved answer. These difficult cases sharpen our sword and make us a better master of our tools. Use shared strategies to test the stories and determine their likely truths, while learning more about each character. Clarify the resources for discovering these people and circumstances in these accidents reported by our clients. Follow these historic cases from question to full answers to opportunity.
Writing, Documenting, and Publishing Conclusions Incorporating DNA Test Results
Thomas W. Jones, PhD, CG®, CGL, FASG
Attendees will learn strategies for clearly describing genetic-genealogy conclusions to diverse readerships, as shown in twenty-one peer-reviewed articles. The techniques include explaining more than in traditional genealogy case studies, because DNA concepts are unfamiliar to many genealogy readers; designing more tables and figures, because genetic-genealogy writing includes more numerical data and family relationships than other genealogical writing; and obtaining permissions, if possible, or presenting data anonymously, because DNA-base studies use more living people as research subjects than other genealogical writing. The lecture also addresses the pros and cons of publishing versus private sharing and working with a publisher versus self-publishing.
12:00 - 12:15 pm Break (15 minutes)
12:15 - 1:45 pm Wasatch 1/2
Lunch, pre-registration required
Every Day is a Winding Road: Adventures in a Genealogy Career
Kenyatta D. Berry, JD
Outside Wasatch 1/2
BCG Portfolios and ICAPGEN Projects Available
1:45 - 2:00 pm Break (15 minutes)
2:00 - 3:15 pm Are You Ready for a GDPR World?
Fiona Fitzsimons
The EU GDPR is the newest and most forceful Data Protection legislation to date. Although it originates in Europe, its reach extends around the world, to any business, whether an individual, partnership or company that handles the personal data of EU citizens. Punitive measures for breaches of the legislation may include substantial fines and a court appearance. This talk will address what are the key definitions in the law? How is the law enforced? How does it impact on our genealogy profession? And what simple steps can you take to be GDPR compliant?
Illegitimacy, Desertion, and Divorce: Using Indirect Evidence to Find Nicholas Mauer
Karen Mauer Jones, CG®, FGBS
Nicholas fathered an illegitimate child in Germany, then brought the child and his mother to southern Indiana, where he deserted them. Did he go to Minnesota and begin a new family? Is the Nicholas Mauer in Stearns County, Minnesota, the same man who left his family in Indiana? This lecture explores the indirect evidence necessary to make the case that he is indeed the same man. Besides that concept, the case study illustrates resolving conflicting evidence, using comparative timelines, using negative evidence, applying FAN club principles, understanding historical and religious context, and finally applying the Genealogical Proof Standard.
Delivering Engaging Presentations
Michael J. Leclerc, CG®
From preparing slides and syllabus material to the delivery to the audience, a good presentation has many components. Among the topics participants will learn about are: structuring a presentation, creating appropriate visuals, getting the audience to hear you instead of just listening (and vice versa), handling hecklers, speaking online versus speaking in person, and more. Participants will leave with tools and processes to invigorate their speaking engagements.
3:15 - 3:45 pm Break (1/2 hour)
Refreshments sponsored by MyHeritage
3:45 - 5:00 pm Proof Discussions: Strategies for Success
Melissa Johnson, CG®
Learn how to develop proof summaries and proof arguments for a variety of uses— to incorporate into client reports, to embed into narratives and summaries, and to write for publication. This lecture will teach strategies for organizing, structuring, and writing proof arguments.
Historical Tours: You Know It, So Tell It
Benjamin Hollister
Experienced genealogists have built up a huge store of knowledge about particular areas and the people who lived there. People are interested in experiences that connect them to people and places. Historical tours let you meet their needs, gain new clients, keep fit, and create another income stream.
If You Build It, They Will Come: Creating a Website for Your Genealogy Business
Elizabeth O'Neal
If you think your business doesn’t need a website, then think again. Potential clients will most likely do an Internet search before choosing a professional genealogist, and if they can’t find your website, they can’t find YOU. Learn how to get your business website up and running quickly and easily.
5:00 - 6:00 pm Wasatch 1/2
Door Prizes & Closing Session
Must be present to win prizes

 

PMC Details

APG Annual Meeting
PMC attendees are invited to attend the APG Annual Meeting Thursday, 19 September, at 5:00 p.m., immediately following the last session, in Wasatch 1 and 2. The meeting will review the past year's accomplishments and report on membership statistics, financial statements, educational opportunities, and chapter activities.

Door Prizes
APG will offer door-prize drawings at the conclusion of Thursday's and Saturday's sessions. All PMC attendees are eligible for door prizes. You must be present at the drawing to win.

Luncheons
In order to attend the luncheon sessions, you must purchase a ticket. All lunches will be buffets with choices for those with dietary restrictions. If you have a question about the lunches, send an email to pmc@apgen.org.

Name Badges
Name badges will show your full name as it is on your registration. Above your name in larger letters will be the first name you go by. If you want a first name on your tag other than the one on your registration, please send an email to pmc@apgen.org.

Photography
Two official PMC photographers will be taking photos for publicity and for posting on social media, including photos of sessions in progress. These photographers will be identified by an "Official PMC Photographer" ribbon on their name badges. By registering for the conference, you agree to give APG permission to use photographs that include your likeness for publicity and for posting on social media.

Recording Package
The Association of Professional Genealogists is pleased to announce that a package of 12 recorded presentations, and the digital conference syllabus, from the 2019 Professional Management Conference will be available for purchase. These presentations by some of the top experts in our field cover a wide variety of topics of importance to professional genealogists. The package is available for pre-order now, and will be for sale through July 2020. Visit https://www.apgen.org/catalog/pmc_recording_package.html to purchase.

Cancellation Policy

Professional Management Conference registration fees will be refunded as follows, upon receipt of written request (e-mail accepted). [APG Policy Manual, Section XVII.V.A and XVII.V.B]

  1. Full refund minus 25% non-refundable administration fee if requested thirty days or more prior to the conference.
  2. No refund for cancellations less than thirty days prior to the conference, but registrants will receive the syllabus.




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