<table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="0" ><tr><td valign="top" style="font: inherit;">Harold and Debbi,<br><br>I know several professional genealogists who are full-time.&nbsp; They are living in the Salt Lake City area and are usually attached to large genealogy firms.&nbsp; There are some independents who are also supporting themselves.&nbsp; It has been this way for years.&nbsp; Others do non-research but are associated with genealogically-related activities such as publishing, etc.<br><br>You won't be able to sustain yourself from speaking at conferences or writing articles.&nbsp; You must be actively involved with research in order to make enough money to sustain yourself.&nbsp; You may also need to work for attorneys and other professional types in order to get clients supplied to you along with your own advertising.&nbsp; I would suggest that you look at the websites of several genealogists to see what type of services are being
 offered.<br><br>A good research background will open more financial doors for you.<br><br>Jeanette Daniels<br>Heritage Genealogical College<br><br>--- On <b>Sat, 6/11/11, Harold Henderson <i>&lt;librarytraveler@gmail.com&gt;</i></b> wrote:<br><blockquote style="border-left: 2px solid rgb(16, 16, 255); margin-left: 5px; padding-left: 5px;"><br>From: Harold Henderson &lt;librarytraveler@gmail.com&gt;<br>Subject: Re: [APG Public List] Genalogy business plan<br>To: "Debbi Lyon" &lt;dlyontamer@verizon.net&gt;<br>Cc: apgpubliclist@apgen.org<br>Date: Saturday, June 11, 2011, 5:42 AM<br><br><div id="yiv2106982796">Debbi --<br><br>(1) and (2). What Michael said.<br><br>(3) Not right away. At best it takes time. Check out the relevant chapters in the book Professional Genealogy edited by Elizabeth Shown Mills.<br><br>Earning money in genealogy generally requires having more than one income stream -- client research, writing, publishing, lecturing, teaching, for
 instance. Many professionals have additional means of support. I don't know of any count, but at APG's most recent roundtable on looking for clients, only one of the four panelists was a full-time genealogist with no spouse to help out with health insurance.<br>
<br>Harold<br><br><br><div class="yiv2106982796gmail_quote">On Fri, Jun 10, 2011 at 10:04 PM, Debbi Lyon <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a rel="nofollow" ymailto="mailto:dlyontamer@verizon.net" target="_blank" href="/mc/compose?to=dlyontamer@verizon.net">dlyontamer@verizon.net</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="yiv2106982796gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
<div style="font-family:Verdana;color:#000000;font-size:12px;"><div>Hello,</div><div>I need help writing a business plan for my genealogy business. I would appreciate some insight either publicly or via e-mail. </div><div>
1) How&nbsp;are professional genealogists able to recoup travel and hotel fees when the are not paid for a speaking gig at the convention?</div><div>2) How do the pros get reimbursed for the time involved in writing an article that is published in a scholarly genealogy publication?</div>
<div>3) Is there room for one more genealogist to make a decent living (and pay for medical benefits) or is the field already too crowded?</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>I have worked as a freelance writer/photographer in the music industry and I wonder if genealogy vendors comp trips, tickets, supplies and subscriptions&nbsp;like the record labels do. </div>
<div>Thank you,</div><div>Debbi</div><div>&nbsp;</div></div>
</blockquote></div><br><br clear="all"><br>-- <br>Harold Henderson<br>Research and Writing from NW Indiana<br>Professional genealogy in and around Chicago -- Rockford to Fort Wayne, Muskegon to Indianapolis<br><a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://midwesternmicrohistory.blogspot.com">midwesternmicrohistory.blogspot.com</a><br>
<a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://midwestroots.net">midwestroots.net</a><div style="display:inline;"></div><br>
</div></blockquote></td></tr></table>