<HTML><HEAD></HEAD>
<BODY dir=ltr>
<DIV dir=ltr>
<DIV style="FONT-FAMILY: 'Times New Roman'; COLOR: #000000; FONT-SIZE: 12pt">
<DIV>I’d be happy to answer your questions from my experience:</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>1. If you are not being paid for a lecture, then all of the expenses, as 
well as the time that is spent actually conducting the necessary research and 
creating the lecture, come out of your pocket. This is why many speakers do not 
provide unpaid lectures (unless for a local society where costs are 
minimal).</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>2. If you write an article for a scholarly journal that does not pay 
writers, then you do not get reimbursed. On the other hand, many case studies 
that are published develop out of client research projects for which the 
researcher was paid, and published articles often lead to more paying jobs. So 
while you are not paid directly by the journals, you can sometimes chalk it up 
as “advertising.”</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>3. There are always opportunities for more genealogists. There are also 
many ways to set yourself apart from the crowd, either through creating your own 
niche or providing a service that others do not, etc. There are also a lot of 
“professional” genealogists who do not produce quality work, so doing so will in 
and of itself help to set you apart from others.</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>Hope this helps. You may also like to join the Transitional Genealogists 
Forum mailing list, hosted by Rootsweb. These sorts of questions are right at 
home on this mailing list as well.</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><BR>Michael 
Hait<BR>michael.hait@hotmail.com<BR>http://www.haitfamilyresearch.com</DIV>
<DIV 
style="FONT-STYLE: normal; DISPLAY: inline; FONT-FAMILY: 'Calibri'; COLOR: #000000; FONT-SIZE: small; FONT-WEIGHT: normal; TEXT-DECORATION: none">
<DIV style="FONT: 10pt tahoma">
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV style="BACKGROUND: #f5f5f5">
<DIV style="font-color: black"><B>From:</B> <A title=dlyontamer@verizon.net 
href="mailto:dlyontamer@verizon.net">Debbi Lyon</A> </DIV>
<DIV><B>Sent:</B> Friday, June 10, 2011 11:04 PM</DIV>
<DIV><B>To:</B> <A title=apgpubliclist@apgen.org 
href="mailto:apgpubliclist@apgen.org">apgpubliclist@apgen.org</A> </DIV>
<DIV><B>Subject:</B> [APG Public List] Genalogy business plan</DIV></DIV></DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV></DIV>
<DIV 
style="FONT-STYLE: normal; DISPLAY: inline; FONT-FAMILY: 'Calibri'; COLOR: #000000; FONT-SIZE: small; FONT-WEIGHT: normal; TEXT-DECORATION: none">
<DIV style="FONT-FAMILY: verdana; COLOR: #000000; FONT-SIZE: 12px">
<DIV>Hello,</DIV>
<DIV>I need help writing a business plan for my genealogy business. I would 
appreciate some insight either publicly or via e-mail. </DIV>
<DIV>1) How are professional genealogists able to recoup travel and hotel fees 
when the are not paid for a speaking gig at the convention?</DIV>
<DIV>2) How do the pros get reimbursed for the time involved in writing an 
article that is published in a scholarly genealogy publication?</DIV>
<DIV>3) Is there room for one more genealogist to make a decent living (and pay 
for medical benefits) or is the field already too crowded?</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>I have worked as a freelance writer/photographer in the music industry and 
I wonder if genealogy vendors comp trips, tickets, supplies and subscriptions 
like the record labels do. </DIV>
<DIV>Thank you,</DIV>
<DIV>Debbi</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></BODY></HTML>