<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML><HEAD>
<META http-equiv=Content-Type content="text/html; charset=US-ASCII">
<META content="MSHTML 6.00.2900.6058" name=GENERATOR></HEAD>
<BODY id=role_body style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: #000000; FONT-FAMILY: Arial" 
bottomMargin=7 leftMargin=7 topMargin=7 rightMargin=7><FONT id=role_document 
face=Arial color=#000000 size=2>
<DIV>
<DIV>
<DIV>And, as someone else has pointed out, we need to keep in mind that most of 
this discussion has been about how names were recorded in records as opposed to 
legal names used by a family.&nbsp; We are usually seeing only what the clerk 
wrote down. The individual or the family may or may not have used the Sr and Jr 
appellations. For all the reasons cited by others, be careful about assuming 
relationships based of Sr and Jr.</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>In a message dated 3/8/2011 1:13:40 P.M. Central Standard Time, 
hooperdebbie@hotmail.com writes:</DIV>
<BLOCKQUOTE 
style="PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: blue 2px solid"><FONT 
  style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" face=Tahoma color=#000000 size=2>If I 
  may jump in here... &nbsp;At IGHR last year Lloyd DeWitt Bockstruck mentioned 
  in his Intermediate Genealogy class that, in an area with two men of the same 
  name, the elder would be called "Sr." while the younger would be referred to 
  as "Jr." &nbsp;As previously mentioned, they were not necessarily father and 
  son. &nbsp;In fact, there may be no relationship at all. 
  <DIV><BR></DIV>
  <DIV>Debbie Hooper</DIV>
  <DIV><BR><BR><BR><BR><BR><BR><BR><BR>&gt; JFonkert wrote:<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; 
  &gt;&gt;&gt;My understanding is that Jr and Sr are not even necessarily son 
  and <BR>&gt; &gt;&gt;&gt;father.<BR>&gt; &gt;&gt;&gt;If there were two men of 
  the same name in a locale, one might be known<BR>&gt; &gt;&gt;&gt; as Sr. and 
  one as Jr. based on their ages. They might be cousins<BR>&gt; &gt;&gt;&gt;or 
  something else.<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; <BR>&gt;<BR></DIV>=</FONT></BLOCKQUOTE></DIV>
<DIV></DIV></DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT lang=2 face=Arial size=2 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" PTSIZE="10">Jay Fonkert, 
CG<BR><A 
href="http://fourgenerationsgenealogy.blogspot.com/">http://fourgenerationsgenealogy.blogspot.com/</A><BR>Saint 
Paul, MN<BR><BR>Director, Association of Professional 
Genealogists<BR>(</FONT><FONT lang=2 face=Arial color=#000000 size=1 
FAMILY="SANSSERIF" PTSIZE="8">professional profile at <A 
href="http://www.apgen.org)/">www.apgen.org)</A></FONT><FONT lang=2 face=Arial 
color=#000000 size=2 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" PTSIZE="10"><BR>Member, Genealogical 
Speakers Guild<BR></FONT><FONT lang=2 face=Arial color=#000000 size=1 
FAMILY="SANSSERIF" PTSIZE="8">(professional profile at <A 
href="http://www.genealogicalspeakersguild.org/)">http://www.genealogicalspeakersguild.org/)</A><U><BR></FONT><FONT 
lang=2 face=Arial color=#000000 size=2 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" 
PTSIZE="10"></U>Member, International Society of Family History Writers and 
Editors <BR><BR></FONT><FONT lang=2 face=Arial color=#000000 size=1 
FAMILY="SANSSERIF" PTSIZE="8">CG (Certified Genealogist) is a service mark of 
the Board for Certification of Genealogists, used under license by 
Board-certified associates after periodic competency evaluations.</FONT><FONT 
lang=2 face=Arial color=#000000 size=2 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" 
PTSIZE="10"><BR></FONT></DIV></FONT></BODY></HTML>