<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML><HEAD>
<META http-equiv=Content-Type content="text/html; charset=US-ASCII">
<META content="MSHTML 6.00.6002.18332" name=GENERATOR></HEAD>
<BODY id=role_body style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: #000000; FONT-FAMILY: Arial"  bottomMargin=7 leftMargin=7 topMargin=7 rightMargin=7><FONT id=role_document  face=Arial color=#000000 size=2>
<DIV>Dee-</DIV>
<DIV><BR>Your situation is different in that there was no marriage. Where a 
marriage exists there is a legal presumption that the husband fathered the 
children born during the marriage--unless someone could prove otherwise. Where 
there is NO marriage then parentage would have to be established through other 
means--in your case the birth records of the children.</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>Joan</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>
<DIV>In a message dated 1/9/2011 7:23:28 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, 
wncgen@yahoo.com writes:</DIV>
<BLOCKQUOTE  style="PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: blue 2px solid"><FONT    style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" face=Arial color=#000000 size=2>
  <DIV>I have two grandchildren who are drawing Social Security.&nbsp; Their 
  father is deceased.&nbsp; He and their mother (my duaghter) were never married 
  (they were under 18 when the kids were born and I refused to sign for her to 
  marry him because I knew he was a drug addict.&nbsp; We think an overdose 
  killed him at age 33.)&nbsp; When my daughter applied for SS for them after 
  his death, she was not asked about a marriage - just their birth certificates 
  as marriage doesn't prove fatherhood.&nbsp; Hope this helps.</DIV>
  <DIV>Dee<BR></DIV></FONT></BLOCKQUOTE></DIV></FONT></BODY></HTML>