<html><head><style type="text/css"><!-- DIV {margin:0px;} --></style></head><body><div style="font-family:arial, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:10pt"><DIV>I agree with Kathy.&nbsp; In&nbsp;a quitclaim deed, as I have learned,&nbsp; the owner of the land relinquishes his own rights to the land, but does not guarantee a clear title to the land.&nbsp; In other words, the <A style="BACKGROUND-IMAGE: none; BORDER-BOTTOM: darkgreen 0.07em solid; PADDING-BOTTOM: 1px !important; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent !important; PADDING-LEFT: 0pt; PADDING-RIGHT: 0pt; COLOR: darkgreen !important; FONT-SIZE: 100% !important; FONT-WEIGHT: normal !important; TEXT-DECORATION: underline !important; PADDING-TOP: 0pt" class=iAs href="http://www.citizen-times.com/article/2010312060013#" target=_blank classname="iAs" itxtdid="21807252">seller</A> is saying that he is giving a clear title of <U>his</U> ownership, but cannot guarantee that there are no other encumbrances held by
 others which would affect a clear title.&nbsp; I have seen this done when the owners wanted to change the type of ownership they held, but could not due to laws against selling land to oneself.&nbsp; The person chose a very trusted person and sold the land to that person who turned around and sold it back to them.&nbsp; As Kathy said, it was need to clear up a problem with the title at times.&nbsp; It would be interesting to know the price of the land when she sold to her cousin and the price when it was sold back to her.&nbsp; (I have seen several lease-and-release deeds is SC where the price for the lease is one peppercorn.)</DIV>
<DIV>Dee</DIV>
<DIV style="FONT-FAMILY: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; FONT-SIZE: 10pt"><BR>
<DIV style="FONT-FAMILY: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; FONT-SIZE: 13px"><FONT size=2 face=Tahoma>
<HR SIZE=1>
<B><SPAN style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold">From:</SPAN></B> "Kathy Gunter Sullivan, CG" &lt;sully1@carolina.rr.com&gt;<BR><B><SPAN style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold">To:</SPAN></B> finleyc@sonoma.edu<BR><B><SPAN style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold">Cc:</SPAN></B> apgpubliclist@apgen.org<BR><B><SPAN style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold">Sent:</SPAN></B> Thu, December 9, 2010 8:28:03 PM<BR><B><SPAN style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold">Subject:</SPAN></B> Re: [APG Public List] Qutclaim puzzler<BR></FONT><BR>Hi Carmen,<BR><BR>I have similar examples in my research, and the background context also <BR>puzzles me. Some instances I suspect--but have been unable to <BR>confirm--are transactions intended to provide clear, "un-muddied' titles <BR>to the real estate.<BR><BR>Kathy<BR><BR><A href="mailto:finleyc@sonoma.edu" ymailto="mailto:finleyc@sonoma.edu">finleyc@sonoma.edu</A> wrote:<BR>&gt; I do not know how to interpret some quitclaims. One, in particular, shows<BR>&gt; Lizzie Armstrong Jones, age 57,
 quitclaims her homestead in Cloverdale, CA<BR>&gt; to her cousin, Emma Flaugher, age 47, in June 1907. In December of that<BR>&gt; same year, Emma sells the same homestead back to Lizzie.<BR>&gt;<BR>&gt; Emma is shown as a member of Lizzie’s household in Cloverdale in 1910 and<BR>&gt; in 1920 census records.<BR>&gt;<BR>&gt; Lizzie also sells three lots in Guerneville to Emma in December 1907. Emma<BR>&gt; sells these back to Lizzie in three separate deals in subsequent years.<BR>&gt; Lizzie died in 1924.<BR>&gt;<BR>&gt; These may well be two separate questions, but why would Lizzie quitclaim<BR>&gt; her home to her cousin for a period of six months?<BR>&gt;<BR>&gt; Carmen Finley<BR>&gt;<BR>&gt;<BR>&gt;&nbsp; <BR><BR><BR></DIV></DIV></div><br>

      </body></html>