<br><div class="gmail_quote"><br>Five men were listed on the Duplin County, NC tax lists of 1811 but no location was found for the lands on which they were taxed. I am hoping to<br>
find the location of those lands. Following the advice of listmembers, during these past ten months I did the following:<br>
1. purchased a NC Research book by Helen LEARY;<br>
2. purchased a study of land records by LINN;<br>
3. purchased a book on genealogical research in general by VALWOOD. <br><br>I have read every word the authors wrote in those three books on use of land records, several times.<br>
<br>
In neither of those books did I find any directions and/or research strategy for locating the<br>
lands on which those five men were taxed.<br>
<br>
So, I went to Kenansville, Duplin Co., NC courthouse,  and, using the census as my guide to neighbors, platted all the<br>
neighbors&#39; lands surrounding those of the four men remaining in Duplin County  by 1820. I went ten persons before the person of interest and ten persons after that person----don&#39;t know where I found that idea-----and I used land records as closely dated to the 1811 tax listings as I could find. <br>
<br>Back home, I put all my little plats together, again using the census as my guide, and lo and behold, there are a couple of &quot;holes&quot; in the plats. <br><br>I also looked up and copied, deeds of land that belonged to witnesses to the deeds I platted. <br>

<br>
Is there anyone on this list who has the time and knowledge to tell me what next? How do I find the deeds to lands that are &quot;holes&quot; in my plats?<br>BTW: the entire time I was in Kenansville, a law firm was using something called plat books, so I did not get to become familiar with them. The assistant at the desk informed me the law firms&#39; researchers take priority when it comes to use of courthouse materials. I was in Kenansville ten days, but only eight at the courthouse.<br>
<br>TIA<br><br>Mag Parker<br>
<br>
</div><br>