<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">Now if you'd asked me the odds on that I'd have said 'astronomical'. &nbsp; Very interesting!<div><br></div><div>Didn't realize that about Indiana (which I'm looking at right now) and Iowa, will watch for it.</div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div>thanks, that's a good reminder that all things are possible in genealogy!</div><div><br></div><div>Larry</div><div><br></div><div><div><div>On 2010-11-27, at 2:12 PM, <a href="mailto:LikinsGenes@aol.com">LikinsGenes@aol.com</a> wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite">
<div style="FONT-FAMILY: Arial; COLOR: #000000; FONT-SIZE: 10pt" id="role_body" bottommargin="7" leftmargin="7" rightmargin="7" topmargin="7"><font id="role_document" color="#000000" size="2" face="Arial">
<div>Larry wrote:</div>
<div>&nbsp;</div>
<div>&gt; mn is Minnesota but also Mongolia (not going to be a lot of confusion 
in genealogical&nbsp; circles for that one but....).</div>
<div>&nbsp;</div>
<div>I can't resist mentioning that my two oldest children were born in 
Minnesota, but my youngest was born in Mongolia. (I'm not making this up.) If 
confusion can happen, it probably eventually will. Since it is difficult to know 
what an abbreviation might mean to someone else (especially in the future), it 
seems to me safe to spell out the place name whenever possible. Another example 
is that Indiana was often abbreviated as "Ia." in the mid 1800s, but now IA 
stands for Iowa. I was thrown off by that one myself.</div>
<div>&nbsp;</div>
<div>Andy Likins</div>
<div>Colorado Springs, CO</div></font></div></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>