<html><head><style type="text/css"><!-- DIV {margin:0px;} --></style></head><body><div style="font-family:times new roman,new york,times,serif;font-size:14pt"><div>I forgot to add the APG Public when sending this comment.<br></div><div style="font-family: times new roman,new york,times,serif; font-size: 14pt;"><br><div style="font-family: times new roman,new york,times,serif; font-size: 12pt;"><font face="Tahoma" size="2">----- Forwarded Message ----<br><b><span style="font-weight: bold;">From:</span></b> Jeanette Daniels &lt;jeanettedaniels8667@yahoo.com&gt;<br><b><span style="font-weight: bold;">To:</span></b> Larry Boswell &lt;laboswell@rogers.com&gt;<br><b><span style="font-weight: bold;">Sent:</span></b> Sat, November 27, 2010 9:51:19 AM<br><b><span style="font-weight: bold;">Subject:</span></b> Re: [APG Public List] Citing a manuscript<br></font><br>
<div style="font-family: times new roman,new york,times,serif; font-size: 14pt;">Larry,<br><br>Thanks for pointing out the confusions.&nbsp; Yes, abbreviations can take on many meanings.&nbsp; <br><br>Jeanette Daniels<br>Heritage Genealogical College<br><div><br></div><div style="font-family: times new roman,new york,times,serif; font-size: 14pt;"><br><div style="font-family: times new roman,new york,times,serif; font-size: 12pt;"><font face="Tahoma" size="2"><hr size="1"><b><span style="font-weight: bold;">From:</span></b> Larry Boswell &lt;laboswell@rogers.com&gt;<br><b><span style="font-weight: bold;">To:</span></b> Bonnie Kohler &lt;kohlerbj@bellsouth.net&gt;<br><b><span style="font-weight: bold;">Cc:</span></b> APG Public List &lt;apgpubliclist@apgen.org&gt;<br><b><span style="font-weight: bold;">Sent:</span></b> Sat, November 27, 2010 7:22:47 AM<br><b><span style="font-weight: bold;">Subject:</span></b> Re: [APG Public List] Citing a
 manuscript<br></font><br>
<base>There is an online version for CMOS with search and other tools, for about $30 subscription which I find to be more useful than hardcopy.<div><br></div><div>Domain codes also use the two letter (as in Pa) style, but the problem is that there is no agreement on what letter code applies where. &nbsp;CA is both California and Canada. &nbsp;At one point there was a sense that the country domain codes would be capitalized but that hasn't worked out. &nbsp;People use ca, Ca, CA for both. &nbsp;CH for Switzerland is also now used for church websites ( <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://xchurch.ch">xchurch.ch</a>) &nbsp;</div><div><br></div><div>mn is Minnesota but also Mongolia (not going to be a lot of confusion in genealogical &nbsp;circles for that one but....). &nbsp; &nbsp;LV is both Las Vegas and Latvia (again not much chance of errors there either!). &nbsp;Laos and Los Angeles have something in common
 (la).</div><div><br></div><div>Belgium as as 'be' , &nbsp;used also by a canton in Switzerland. &nbsp; Some country/state codes are also used as domain codes for non-geographic uses. &nbsp;Colombia as co also of course denotes 'company'. &nbsp; 'md' used increasingly by medical industry once belonged to Moldova. &nbsp;Some of these are obviously not going to be confused, but it demonstrates how there is little regard for how these are assigned. &nbsp;Me is Maine, Montenegro, and now becoming popular domain name used by individuals (in the sense of 'my site'). &nbsp;Sites ending in 'in' could be internet related or in India. &nbsp;And so on.</div><div><br></div><div>Could be solved if they'd gone with three letter domain codes instead of two</div><div><br></div><div>So inside the US Pa would be recognized as the state, but possibly only to US residents. &nbsp;So maybe it would be better to stick with the old abbreviation and if necessary put the domain
 code/postal one Pa in brackets.&nbsp;</div><div><br></div><div>Larry</div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br><div><div>On 2010-11-27, at 8:08 AM, Bonnie Kohler wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; font-size: medium;"><div><div><font face="Arial">Cathi wrote:</font></div><div><font face="Arial"></font>&nbsp;</div><div><div>- Since "c1850s-1911" includes an abbreviation for "circa," does the abbreviation not require a period? I usually use ca., and I presume that ca. and c. are interchangeable, but I thought both required a period.&nbsp;</div><div><br></div><div>-I believe that it is
 preferable to use traditional abbreviations for the names of states, rather than the postal codes, but where do we find the most acceptable abbreviations? I have been using "Penn." for Pennsylvania, but I notice that Elizabeth uses "Pa." Are these abbreviations standardized somewhere? Or are several different forms acceptable, such as Pa. and Penn.?</div><div><font face="Arial">- - - - - - - - - - - -</font></div><div><font face="Arial"></font>&nbsp;</div><div><font face="Arial">Cathi,</font></div><div><font face="Arial"></font>&nbsp;</div><div><font face="Arial">When I'm in a hurry, I just Google these questions. For a definitive answer, I refer to the _Chicago Manual of Style_. I feel the CMOS is a good investment because I refer to it often.</font></div><div><font face="Arial"></font>&nbsp;</div><div><font face="Arial">Bonnie Dunphy Kohler</font></div><div><font
 face="Arial">Florida</font></div></div></div></span></blockquote></div><br></div></div></div>
</div><br>







      </div></div>
</div><br>







      </body></html>