<html><head><base href="x-msg://25/"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">I think it is relatively common. &nbsp;I have quite a few examples, though in some cases the child knew the grandparents were not the actual parents. &nbsp;In one an individual who was with the Mormons in Nauvoo, Illinois in the 1840s, having joined up in Canada, married in Nauvoo, where he had a son whom he named James. &nbsp;After the sudden death of his wife he left and returned to Canada leaving his infant son to be raised by relatives in a similar way to your story. &nbsp;But when he returned to Canada, he remarried, had another son by his second wife whom he promptly named James. &nbsp;So two half-brothers both named James grew up a thousand miles apart, never knowing each other. &nbsp;Both sons named their sons James, and the name continued through several more generations in the two widely separated descendant lines.<div><br></div><div>Larry</div><div><br></div><div><br><div><div>On 2010-11-13, at 9:54 PM, Rosalie Schack wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; "><div class="hmmessage" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Tahoma; ">The discusion about adopted children reminds me of research I did for a client who wanted to&nbsp;know if her grandmother was adopted. Her grandmother was the youngest of a family of&nbsp;many siblings. Research revealed that she was the daughter of the oldest sibling, born out of wedlock. This was before&nbsp;births &nbsp;were recorded, but church&nbsp;baptismal records revealed the&nbsp;parantage. The father's name was not given. The child was raised as the youngest sibling&nbsp;in the family, and the child's mother married a few years later and moved&nbsp;to another state,&nbsp;leaving her daughter to be raised by her parents, ie. the&nbsp;child's&nbsp;grandparents.&nbsp;A state census&nbsp;listed a&nbsp;different birthplace of father and mother for this&nbsp;youngest child, as compared to her older "siblings", but every other record located&nbsp;listed her as the daughter of her grandparents. Although never formally adopted, she was raised as a daughter instead of a granddaughter, and she always considered her grandparents her parents. It made for a complicated report. I was glad I didn't have to&nbsp;fill out a family chart! At least the biological line and the adoptive line are the same. I'm sure this is a situation that is not unique.<br>&nbsp;<br>Rosalie<br><br>&nbsp;<br>-----------------------<br>Rosalie Eben Schack, CG<br>Owatonna, Minnesota<br><br><br><br><br>&nbsp;<br></div></span></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>