<div>Jacqueline, who says?</div>
<div> </div>
<div>I can tell you my personal experience with this. I am the issue of my mother&#39;s first marriage. They divorced when I was 1. Her second husband adopted me when I was 3. He is, and always will be, my father. He raised me and I trace his line as my own. That said, I will also eventually trace my biological father&#39;s line as well, primarily for health reasons. Unfortunately there is no quick answer to this question. Each adopted individual views their adoptive parents and their biological parents differently, and thus will have a different view on which lines take priority. In the end I would trace both--just more leads to follow! </div>

<div> </div>
<div>For a client project I&#39;m with Stephen--ask them what they want. For my own personal lines I would prioritize the parents they spent the most time with--were they old enough when they were adopted to have formed a bond w/the biological parents?</div>

<div> </div>
<div>Incidentally it would take an above average genealogist to discover I was adopted. If they went purely on my vital records they would never guess. Both my birth and my marriage certificates indicate I am the daughter of my adopted father (Utah issues new birth certificates on adoption.) Only by tracing my mother, and discovering that she had a first marriage at the time I was born, would they ever think to look at adoption and/or court records. Of course they may also take one look at that first marriage, discover it was before my birth date, and decide that there must be two Barbara Oldhams. (No census records would cover that first marriage.) </div>

<div> </div>
<div>I suspect there are more of these hidden relationships in our family lines than we think there are.</div>
<div> </div>
<div>Christy Fillerup<br><br></div>
<div class="gmail_quote">On Sat, Nov 13, 2010 at 2:40 PM, Jacqueline Wilson <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:wilssearch@gmail.com">wilssearch@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote style="BORDER-LEFT: #ccc 1px solid; MARGIN: 0px 0px 0px 0.8ex; PADDING-LEFT: 1ex" class="gmail_quote">My problem is this - when the first person of the line is the adopted person, I have been told that I must follow the birth family no matter the legalities of no longer belonging to the birth family even if still related by blood.  (hope that made sense!)<br>
<br>I have a client who has an adopted person in their line.  I am trying to decide how to handle it as far as research goes.  Do I include the adopting family in my research and reports?<br><br>Thanks<br>~Jackie<br>
<div class="im">On Nov 13, 2010, at 1:53 PM, Charles S. Mason, Jr. wrote:<br><br><br><br>In a couple of my families there was a legal adoption.  In all of my cases<br>they were 20th century adoptions.  Therefore a legal name change was done in<br>
court.<br><br><br></div>
<div class="im">-----Original Message-----<br>From: apgpubliclist-bounces+cgrs791=<a href="http://netscape.com/" target="_blank">netscape.com</a>@<a href="http://apgen.org/" target="_blank">apgen.org</a><br>[mailto:<a href="mailto:apgpubliclist-bounces%2Bcgrs791">apgpubliclist-bounces+cgrs791</a>=<a href="http://netscape.com/" target="_blank">netscape.com</a>@<a href="http://apgen.org/" target="_blank">apgen.org</a>] On Behalf Of<br>
Mary Swanson<br>Sent: Saturday, November 13, 2010 2:21 PM<br>To: <a href="mailto:apgpubliclist@apgen.org">apgpubliclist@apgen.org</a><br>Subject: [APG Public List] Adopted children in genealogy<br><br>I&#39;m interested in the list readers&#39; thoughts concerning the following.  A<br>
husband and wife have two children.  The marriage ends in divorce...the<br>mother remarries and the ex-husband gives up all rights to his two children.<br><br>The two children are then known by their adoptive father&#39;s surname.  All<br>
family members know the biological and adoptive father&#39;s.  The original<br>husband would be noted, of course, as the woman&#39;s first husband and<br>biological father of the two children.  But should the children be entered<br>
only under their adopted surname or should the biological surname be<br>included in parenthesis along with the adopted surname?  Or, is there<br>another way of entering this situation in a genealogy?<br>Thanks, Mary<br><br>
<br><br><br></div>Jacqueline Wilson<br>Evanston, IL<br><br><br>Masters Student,  Dept. US Military History<br>American Military University<br><br><a href="mailto:wilssearch@gmail.com">wilssearch@gmail.com</a><br><br>Professional Indexer, Historian, and Genealogist<br>
Deputy Sheriff for Publications of the Chicago Corral of the Westerners<br>IASPR Newsletter Editor<br><br>&quot;Wilssearch - your service of choice for the indexing challenged genealogist.&quot;<br><br><br><br><br></blockquote>
</div><br>