<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">John as far as I know, there is no such critter. &nbsp;I hear by appoint you chairperson of that there critter! &nbsp;LOL<div><br></div><div>Having said that, there is something going in Salt Lake City entitled&nbsp;<span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Verdana, Tahoma, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 20px; ">RootsTech, to be held February 10 through 12, 2011 which may be the start of what you are talking about. Also check out the Dick Eastman Newsletters. &nbsp;He is constantly evaluating both software and hardware on his newsletter. &nbsp;<a href="http://eogn.com/wp/">http://eogn.com/wp/</a></span></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana, Tahoma, sans-serif" size="3"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 13px; line-height: 20px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana, Tahoma, sans-serif" size="3"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 13px; line-height: 20px;">best, Jackie<br></span></font><div><div>On Nov 9, 2010, at 1:24 PM, John wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline">I have so far only dipped my toes into the professional genealogy world. But I am a retired Ph.D. scientist and then IT professional. So forgive me if this has been hashed out before.<br><br>Is there a professional genealogy body that convenes and develops specifications that genealogy programs need to offer?<br><br>Not knowing the answer, let me float some ideas about such a body.<br><br>It should have vendor representatives, but the body itself must be independent of them.<br><br>It should be composed of individuals with credentials, either genealogical and/or technological.<br><br>They should develop a draft of required features and make it public for comment and review. Similar to the RFC reports developed for specifying computer technologies. Vendors then program to those specifications.<br><br>Good ideas from vendors and their existing programs can be adopted. But the bar can be set high. I'm sure professional genealogists have a wish list for every program they use. How about making one universal wish list, and maybe existing vendors will program to it. Or a new start up will.<br><br>And someone could do a consumer reports like evaluation of how well various vendors meet the critera. And where they fail.<br><br>To me, it currently seems like hit or miss anarchy in the genealogy programming field right now, and sadly, for the foreseeable future.<br><br>Maybe the professionals can lend a helping hand to solve it in this manner.<br><br>In my opinion, having tried many programs,  they all are written by excellent programmers who are amateur genealogists, or excellent genealogists who are amateur programmers. (I leave out the amateur-amateur category. We don't use those! ;-) )<br><br>I'd like to see excellent-excellent, but can' say that about any program I've tried.<br><br>Is it worth advancing this idea?<br><br>Such a team could recommend GEDCOM replacement specifications, or at least attempt to get an intellectual consensus. Recommend multiplatform ability via modern computer technologies (maybe too ambitious, but worthy of a discussion). And much more. I'll stop here for now.<br><br>John<br><br><br>Sent from my Droid X.</div><br><div>
<span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Geneva; font-size: medium; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; "><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Helvetica; font-size: medium; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; "><div style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: 'Lucida Grande'; "><div>Jacqueline Wilson &nbsp;</div><div>Evanston, IL</div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div>Masters Student, &nbsp;Dept. US Military History</div><div>American Military University</div><div><br></div><div><a href="mailto:wilssearch@gmail.com">wilssearch@gmail.com</a></div><div><br></div><div>Professional Indexer, Historian, and Genealogist</div><div>Deputy Sheriff for Publications of the Chicago Corral of the Westerners</div><div>IASPR Newsletter Editor</div><div><div><br></div><div>"Wilssearch - your service of choice for the indexing challenged&nbsp;genealogist."</div></div></span></div><div><br></div></div></span><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"></span><br class="Apple-interchange-newline">
</div>
<br></div></body></html>