<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML><HEAD>
<META content="text/html; charset=US-ASCII" http-equiv=Content-Type>
<META name=GENERATOR content="MSHTML 8.00.6001.18975"></HEAD>
<BODY style="FONT-FAMILY: Arial; COLOR: #000000; FONT-SIZE: 10pt" id=role_body  bottomMargin=7 leftMargin=7 rightMargin=7 topMargin=7><FONT id=role_document  color=#000000 size=2 face=Arial>
<DIV>For all the reasons offered earlier in this and the preceding threads 
"Digital Locations" and "place names," I agree that numerical reference systems 
are a useful way to describe the location of a geographic feature independent of 
changing boundaries and landscapes. As such, it is an item of information 
(evidence, when relevant to an issue) that needs a citation to its source--a 
sextant reading, GPS instrument, map measurement, GoogleMaps solution, 
or&nbsp;an original source cited elsewhere.</DIV>
<DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>I do have a problem with&nbsp;"digital location" as an alternative to "GPS 
location". "Digital location," like the more&nbsp;descriptive "geodetic 
location," is a generic term applicable to&nbsp;different numerical reference 
systems for precisely designating points on the ground.&nbsp;Besides GPS (which 
is not a rectangular grid, and as noted earlier, differs slightly&nbsp;from 
latitude and longitude&nbsp;measured from the&nbsp;traditional meridian through 
the Greenwich Observatory, being based on a line 5.31 seconds of arc to the 
east, or 102.5 meters at the latitude of the observatory), &nbsp;there are a 
number of other digital systems 
for&nbsp;designating&nbsp;geographic&nbsp;locations by numerical reference to a 
rectangular grid on a projected&nbsp;flat surface, known as plane coordinate 
systems. The most common is the UTM or Universal Transverse Mercator grid, with 
locations designated by distance in meters&nbsp;on x and y axes from&nbsp;an 
origin point in each of its 18 east-west zones.&nbsp;Other 
systems,&nbsp;commonly use&nbsp;in land surveying,&nbsp;are the 
older&nbsp;legally-adopted state plane coordinate systems, with locations 
designated in feet north and east from the origin of each state's grid.</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>Note that the GPS designates a location on the most recent calculation of 
the&nbsp;earth's spheroidal surface in relation to its axis and equator. A GPS 
designation as a reference to&nbsp;a particular&nbsp;land location is subject 
to&nbsp;change as the continental plates shift with tectonic drift. The 
precision of the GPS system will now allow&nbsp;these changes to be observed and 
measured over the years (and the aiming points for intercontinental missiles 
adjusted accordingly).</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>Donn 
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT lang=0 size=2 face=Arial FAMILY="SANSSERIF" PTSIZE="10">Donn Devine, 
CG, CGL<BR>Wilmington DE <BR><BR>CG, Certified Genealogist, CGL, and Certified 
Genealogical&nbsp;Lecturer are service marks of the Board for Certification of 
Genealogists, used under license by board certificants after periodic 
evaluation, and the board name is registered in the US Patent &amp; Trademark 
Office.</FONT></DIV></DIV></DIV></FONT></BODY></HTML>