<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML><HEAD>
<META content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" http-equiv=Content-Type>
<META name=GENERATOR content="MSHTML 8.00.6001.18975">
<STYLE></STYLE>
</HEAD>
<BODY bgColor=#ffffff>
<DIV>If establishing the "actual physical location" is meaningless, then why 
would you want to try and establish coordinates for it?&nbsp; There has to be 
some purpose for doing so that is perceived by the researcher.&nbsp; But in the 
case you describe then the family did live in one location.&nbsp; You might have 
been able to find more of that type of "record created in a nearby location" 
type of thing if you carefully used maps (whether establishing coordinates or 
not) and data tracking family and extended family.</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>If physical location and fact are going to be misleading then just like you 
would have to explain why the records were recorded in a one location, while the 
family lived in another location, _whether or not you also marked one or the 
other using a mapping tool_.</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>Larry</DIV>
<BLOCKQUOTE 
style="BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px">
  <DIV style="FONT: 10pt arial">----- Original Message ----- </DIV>
  <DIV 
  style="FONT: 10pt arial; BACKGROUND: #e4e4e4; font-color: black"><B>From:</B> 
  <A title=raybeere@yahoo.com href="mailto:raybeere@yahoo.com">Ray Beere Johnson 
  II</A> </DIV>
  <DIV style="FONT: 10pt arial"><B>To:</B> <A title=apgpubliclist@apgen.org 
  href="mailto:apgpubliclist@apgen.org">APG Posting</A> </DIV>
  <DIV style="FONT: 10pt arial"><B>Sent:</B> Monday, November 01, 2010 3:35 
  PM</DIV>
  <DIV style="FONT: 10pt arial"><B>Subject:</B> Re: [APG Public List] 
  APGPublicList Digest, Vol 12, Issue 38</DIV>
  <DIV><BR></DIV>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Sorry, Larry, but I'm going to have to 
  disagree with you here. Even if you establish the "actual physical location", 
  it may be meaningless.<BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Case in point? I have seen 
  multiple instances in New England where the actual physical location was in 
  one town, but where an event was recorded in a neighbouring town - because the 
  families in question happened to find it more convenient to travel there. 
  Often, this seems to have been a "cultural" issue, not necessarily a 
  geographic one.<BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; I even found one specific event 
  for a surname connected with my family recorded with records for another 
  _county_. Why? Simply because a minister for a certain town performed the 
  wedding ceremony in another town miles away - and the town clerk saw fit to 
  record the event "their" minister oversaw.<BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; In 
  other words, in at least some cases, actual physical location is highly 
  misleading in research - _if_ the researcher is unwary enough to get too hung 
  up on that 
  point.<BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 
  Ray Beere Johnson II<BR><BR>--- On Mon, 11/1/10, L. Boswell &lt;<A 
  href="mailto:laboswell@rogers.com">laboswell@rogers.com</A>&gt; 
  wrote:<BR><BR>&gt; Sorry, maybe I'm missing something here, but I wouldn't say 
  the <BR>&gt; physical location is less important than the artificial 
  boundaries. <BR>&gt; How do you know which boundaries apply if you haven't 
  established the <BR>&gt; actual physical location first (or early on in the 
  research process)? <BR><BR><BR></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>