<html><head><style type="text/css"><!-- DIV {margin:0px;} --></style></head><body><div style="font-family:'times new roman', 'new york', times, serif;font-size:12pt"><div><div>in a couple of words, yes, very much so. &nbsp;It's not extraneous in any sense, and &nbsp;I don't understand how you think it involves "taking the extra time". &nbsp;The degree of precision is of course going to match the same level you employ. &nbsp; Coordinates can be as precise, or as approximate as you care to make them. &nbsp;Just allows a point of reference that translates digitally and manually across multiple tools, including but not limited to maps. &nbsp;Have a "general location" than use "general coordinates."</div><div><br></div><div>But I think if you used mapping to the degree I do, then you would appreciate the value. &nbsp;Location, even a "general location" in most cases is critical information, with our without coordinates. Using a reference set of numbers simply
 allows you to do more with that location information. &nbsp; Do you do any family "history" type research?</div><div><br></div><div>But even using the reasons that you listed as to why you think location of a piece of land is important, so you do as I do, use historic maps and records to identify those items. &nbsp;Often that means going to historical overlays or later maps that do show latitude and longitude, or approximating (or precisely finding) location on an equivalent modern map. &nbsp;Once I do that I simply mark down the coordinates for anything that I "located" by those methods. &nbsp; Then I can calculate distances etc in various ways. &nbsp; Finding coordinates is not a difficult, time consuming process. &nbsp;And of course the researcher defines how precise or general a level those coordinates are being employed at. &nbsp;Useful to mark even an approximate location (as long as that's made clear).</div><div><br></div><div>I don't know why
 you think it takes extra time? &nbsp;I take it you've never used coordinates or you wouldn't come to that conclusion. &nbsp;It's a "time saver". &nbsp;It marks that "USEFUL information" covered by historic maps allowing it to then be used in a digital environment across maps, employing some amazing tools. &nbsp;Think of it as a geographic file reference number that carries more information and can be input into future references and overlays. &nbsp;</div><div><br></div><div>But I don't think this is for you Michael, though I think at some point as more and more digitized mapping tools emerge you'll take another look at it.</div><div><br></div><div>Larry&nbsp;</div></div><div style="font-family:times new roman, new york, times, serif;font-size:12pt"><br><div style="font-family:times new roman, new york, times, serif;font-size:12pt"><font size="2" face="Tahoma"><hr size="1"><b><span style="font-weight: bold;">From:</span></b> Michael Hait
 &lt;michael.hait@hotmail.com&gt;<br><b><span style="font-weight: bold;">To:</span></b> apgpubliclist@apgen.org<br><b><span style="font-weight: bold;">Sent:</span></b> Mon, November 1, 2010 1:04:32 PM<br><b><span style="font-weight: bold;">Subject:</span></b> Re: [APG Public List] mapping and research<br></font><br>



<div dir="ltr">
<div style="FONT-FAMILY:'Times New Roman';COLOR:#000000;FONT-SIZE:12pt;">
<div>I use historic maps in nearly every project.&nbsp; But these historic maps 
do not have latitude/longitude on them usually.&nbsp; I also use land records in 
nearly every project, which allows me to place the land on the maps (at least in 
a general sense).&nbsp; My point is that discovering the general location 
(especially when dealing with a 200-acre farm) is an important step, but 
pinpointing the exact longitude/latitude seems like an extraneous step that does 
not add anything to the research.</div>
<div>&nbsp;</div>
<div>I look at it this way – location of a piece of land is important for the 
following reasons:</div>
<div>- records jurisdiction</div>
<div>- relation to topographical landmarks</div>
<div>- distance to county courthouses</div>
<div>- distance to nearest town</div>
<div>- location of nearest church</div>
<div>- identities of neighbors</div>
<div>- identifying possible migration routes (through relation to bodies of 
water, historic trails, etc)</div>
<div>- (and of course other more creative uses I am sure)</div>
<div>&nbsp;</div>
<div style="FONT-FAMILY:'Times New Roman';COLOR:#000000;FONT-SIZE:12pt;">All 
of these tasks, however, can be completed using historic records and historic 
maps, including identifying topographical landmarks, etc.&nbsp; But how does 
taking the extra time and effort to pinpoint a precise latitude/longitude 
provide additional USEFUL information, not covered by the historic 
records/maps?</div>
<div style="FONT-FAMILY:'Times New Roman';COLOR:#000000;FONT-SIZE:12pt;"><br><br>Michael 
Hait<br>michael.hait@hotmail.com<br><span><a target="_blank" href="http://www.haitfamilyresearch.com">http://www.haitfamilyresearch.com</a></span></div>
<div style="FONT-STYLE:normal;DISPLAY:inline;FONT-FAMILY:'Calibri';COLOR:#000000;FONT-SIZE:small;FONT-WEIGHT:normal;TEXT-DECORATION:none;">
<div style="FONT:10pt tahoma;">
<div>&nbsp;</div>
<div style="BACKGROUND:#f5f5f5;">
<div style=""><b>From:</b> <a rel="nofollow" title="laboswell@rogers.com" ymailto="mailto:laboswell@rogers.com" target="_blank" href="mailto:laboswell@rogers.com">L. Boswell</a> </div>
<div><b>Sent:</b> Monday, November 01, 2010 12:50 PM</div>
<div><b>To:</b> <a rel="nofollow" title="michael.hait@hotmail.com" ymailto="mailto:michael.hait@hotmail.com" target="_blank" href="mailto:michael.hait@hotmail.com">Michael Hait</a> ; <a rel="nofollow" title="apgpubliclist@apgen.org" ymailto="mailto:apgpubliclist@apgen.org" target="_blank" href="mailto:apgpubliclist@apgen.org">apgpubliclist@apgen.org</a> </div>
<div><b>Subject:</b> mapping and research</div></div></div>
<div>&nbsp;</div></div>
<div style="FONT-STYLE:normal;DISPLAY:inline;FONT-FAMILY:'Calibri';COLOR:#000000;FONT-SIZE:small;FONT-WEIGHT:normal;TEXT-DECORATION:none;">
<div style="FONT-FAMILY:times, serif;FONT-SIZE:12pt;">
<div>&nbsp;</div>
<div style="FONT-FAMILY:times new roman, new york, times, serif;FONT-SIZE:12pt;">sorry, 
forgot to change the subject in that last one. 
<div style="FONT-FAMILY:times new roman, new york, times, serif;FONT-SIZE:12pt;"></div></div>
<div style="FONT-FAMILY:times new roman, new york, times, serif;FONT-SIZE:12pt;">&nbsp;</div>
<div style="FONT-FAMILY:times new roman, new york, times, serif;FONT-SIZE:12pt;">Good 
point John, and GPS coordinates mean much the same thing (I just like to remind 
people that this isn't based on something new!)</div>
<div style="FONT-FAMILY:times new roman, new york, times, serif;FONT-SIZE:12pt;">&nbsp;</div>
<div style="FONT-FAMILY:times new roman, new york, times, serif;FONT-SIZE:12pt;">Michael, 
got to thinking here.&nbsp; How important is mapping and the use of maps to you 
in your research?&nbsp;&nbsp; I barely move without referring to a map when I 
working on a file.&nbsp;&nbsp; More likely multiple maps.&nbsp; If your answer 
is "pretty important" than the use of coordinates is simply going to be a good 
tool to have on hand.&nbsp; If you never work with maps, then I can see your 
point.&nbsp; But I don't see how I could do effective research without 
referencing things to a location on a map of some sort</div>
<div style="FONT-FAMILY:times new roman, new york, times, serif;FONT-SIZE:12pt;">&nbsp;</div>
<div style="FONT-FAMILY:times new roman, new york, times, serif;FONT-SIZE:12pt;">Larry</div>
<div style=""></div></div></div></div></div>
</div></div><div style="position:fixed"></div>


</div></body></html>