<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML><HEAD>
<META content="text/html; charset=US-ASCII" http-equiv=Content-Type>
<META name=GENERATOR content="MSHTML 8.00.6001.18975"></HEAD>
<BODY style="FONT-FAMILY: Arial; COLOR: #000000; FONT-SIZE: 10pt" id=role_body  bottomMargin=7 leftMargin=7 rightMargin=7 topMargin=7><FONT id=role_document  color=#000000 size=2 face=Arial>
<DIV>Larry wrrote:</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" color=#000000 size=2  face=Arial>&gt;I'd like to explore options for rationalizing the use of 
coordinates in <BR>conjunction with the use of place names.&nbsp; Seems to me a 
few simple <BR>guidelines would allow someone to tell when coordinates were 
representative <BR>of&nbsp; the whole township and when they referred to a 
specific, (almost) exact <BR>location within the township.<BR><BR>&gt;then it 
wouldn't matter whether historical names or modern names were used <BR>as they 
would all be available by referencing the coordinates they share.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" color=#000000 size=2  face=Arial></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" color=#000000 size=2  face=Arial>It seems to me this can be easily accomplished by cutting back the 
decimal places in the geographic coordinates&nbsp;until they are general enough 
to encompass the entire village, town, county or whatever other area is is being 
referenced.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" color=#000000 size=2  face=Arial></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" color=#000000 size=2  face=Arial>Data results&nbsp;should never be reported with more precision than 
the least precise input justifies. I vividlyremember an undergraduate college 
professor who would shout "You lie!" when an aspiring engineering student 
proudly announced&nbsp;a problem&nbsp;solution to four decimal 
places,&nbsp;derived using&nbsp;five-place log tables, when&nbsp;one of the 
input measure&nbsp;had only three significant figures.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" color=#000000 size=2  face=Arial></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" color=#000000 size=2  face=Arial>Pi may be 3.14159, but the circumference of a 12.0-inch circle is at 
best only 37.7 inches--not the 37.69908 inches a calculator may 
show.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" color=#000000 size=2  face=Arial></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" color=#000000 size=2  face=Arial>Donn Devine</DIV>
<DIV><BR></DIV></FONT></FONT></BODY></HTML>