<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">
<html>
<head>
  <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html;charset=ISO-8859-1">
  <title></title>
</head>
<body text="#000000" bgcolor="#ffffff">
John:<br>
<big>I might suggest that Dr Melinda Kashuba has written an excellent
book on this subject: "Walking with your ancestors: a genealogists
guide to using maps and geography,"&nbsp; Cincinatti, OH: Family Tree Books,
2005.<br>
</big><span style=""><big>The US
Dept of Interior Geographic Names&nbsp;Information System GNIS&nbsp;website at <cite><span
 style="font-style: normal;">geonames.usgs.gov/pls/<span style="">gnis</span>public/
is extremely useful and I
use it often to locate cemeteries and towns. It provides names as well
as coordinates.<br>
Everett Ireland</span></cite></big></span><br>
<br>
Stephen Danko wrote:<br>
<blockquote type="cite"
 cite="mid252755.1122.qm@web503.biz.mail.mud.yahoo.com">
  <style type="text/css"><!-- DIV {margin:0px;} --></style>
  <div
 style="font-family: times new roman,new york,times,serif; font-size: 12pt;">
  <div>
  <div>John,</div>
  <div>&nbsp;</div>
  <div>I agree with the points you make.&nbsp; Someone else wrote to me off
list with the same concerns.&nbsp; I haven't thought this problem completely
through.&nbsp; For now, as a general rule, I plan to use coordinates to one
decimal place to specify a town or village.&nbsp; If I have an exact address
(or location of a tombstone), I'll use four or five decimal places.&nbsp;
Even these plans have their faults.&nbsp; In any case, if I write a
narrative that includes coordinates, I&nbsp;will take your advice
and&nbsp;explain my intent.&nbsp; Perhaps something as simple as "Coordinates
expressed to one decimal place denote a general area.&nbsp; Coordinates
expressed to four decimal places denote an exact location"&nbsp;might be
sufficient.</div>
  <div>&nbsp;</div>
  <div>By the way, where the heck&nbsp;is our esteemed colleague Randy
Seaver?&nbsp; His background and expertise is just what is needed for this
discussion!</div>
  <div>&nbsp;</div>
  <div>Stephen J. Danko</div>
  <div><a href="http://www.stephendanko.com/">http://www.stephendanko.com/</a></div>
  <div>&nbsp;</div>
  </div>
  <div
 style="font-family: times new roman,new york,times,serif; font-size: 12pt;">
  <div style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: 10pt;"><font
 size="2" face="Tahoma">
  <hr size="1"><b><span style="font-weight: bold;">From:</span></b>
John <a class="moz-txt-link-rfc2396E" href="mailto:john@jytangledweb.org">&lt;john@jytangledweb.org&gt;</a><br>
  <b><span style="font-weight: bold;">To:</span></b>
<a class="moz-txt-link-abbreviated" href="mailto:apgpubliclist@apgen.org">apgpubliclist@apgen.org</a><br>
  <b><span style="font-weight: bold;">Sent:</span></b> Tue, October 26,
2010 9:42:50 PM<br>
  <b><span style="font-weight: bold;">Subject:</span></b> Re: [APG
Public List] [APG Members] place names<br>
  </font><br>
Stephen,<br>
  <br>
What you say has truth in it, but in practice one might not<br>
make the leap that the number of significant figures presented<br>
means that the uncertainty is in the next decimal place.<br>
In scientific publications one always attempts a computation<br>
of RMSD (root mean square deviation) and write it with a +/-<br>
to prevent confusion. Like 37.79507 +/-0.00005</div>
  </div>
  </div>
</blockquote>
<br>
<pre class="moz-signature" cols="72">-- 
Everett B. Ireland, CG
CG, Certified Genealogist, is a service mark of the Board for Certification of Genealogists used under 
license by board certificants after periodic evaluation.

</pre>
</body>
</html>