A couple of the best are online at the Perseus Project: <br />http://perseus.uchicago.edu/index.html#LatinTexts<br />Scroll down for dictionary options. <br /><br />I have Cassell&#39;s which is very inexpensive. The problem with Latin dictionaries though is that you have to know  the first person singular form (for verbs) and the nominative/genitive cases (nouns) to be able to look up the words directly.  If you look at the listing you can probably figure it out.  However, you may have trouble figuring out some of the details of grammar without knowing/understanding how Latin endings work. Latin is an inflected language which means that the words change form to reflect case, person, tense, number, etc..  There are very nice charts in the back of Wheelock&#39;s Latin text which also is pretty inexpensive.  <br /><br />Patti<br /><br />On Oct 26, 2010 1:25am, Janey Joyce &lt;jejoyce@sbcglobal.net&gt; wrote:<br />&gt; I am beginning to try to translate some Catholic Church records written in Latin<br />&gt; <br />&gt; and wonder if some of you have some advice for me.<br />&gt; <br />&gt; <br />&gt; <br />&gt; <br />&gt; <br />&gt; Can you recommend a dictionary that isn&#39;t priced in the hundreds of dollars<br />&gt; <br />&gt; range? Have you found a particularly helpful online Latin dictionary?<br />&gt; <br />&gt; <br />&gt; <br />&gt; Some of these documents were written in the 1600s and come from Italian<br />&gt; <br />&gt; churches. Some were written in the late 1800s and come from American churches.<br />&gt; <br />&gt;