<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML><HEAD>
<META content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" http-equiv=Content-Type>
<META name=GENERATOR content="MSHTML 8.00.6001.18975">
<STYLE></STYLE>
</HEAD>
<BODY bgColor=#ffffff>
<DIV>by suggesting it would be a topic for sourcecitations I may have given the 
wrong impression.&nbsp; I'm referring to footnoting the location.</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>But that said, I'd not have a problem with including it as a note appended 
to a citation, given it would clarify location referenced by the citation.&nbsp; 
But what I was thinking of is tagging named&nbsp;locations mentioned in research 
with their real world coordinates (specific or general coordinates)</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>But I wonder too if how we cite things is going to change given digital 
realities.&nbsp; I've argued before that digital access has substantially 
altered such things, and raised new options/potentials (as well as new problems) 
that aren't being fully addressed (my opinion).&nbsp; But that latter bit would 
be better talked about on a list dedicated to such things.</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>Larry</DIV>
<BLOCKQUOTE 
style="BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px">
  <DIV style="FONT: 10pt arial">----- Original Message ----- </DIV>
  <DIV 
  style="FONT: 10pt arial; BACKGROUND: #e4e4e4; font-color: black"><B>From:</B> 
  <A title=eshown@comcast.net 
  href="mailto:eshown@comcast.net">eshown@comcast.net</A> </DIV>
  <DIV style="FONT: 10pt arial"><B>To:</B> <A title=apgpubliclist@apgen.org 
  href="mailto:apgpubliclist@apgen.org">apgpubliclist@apgen.org</A> </DIV>
  <DIV style="FONT: 10pt arial"><B>Sent:</B> Monday, October 25, 2010 10:25 
  PM</DIV>
  <DIV style="FONT: 10pt arial"><B>Subject:</B> Re: [APG Public List] [APG 
  Members] place names</DIV>
  <DIV><BR></DIV>With regard to identifying places by GPS, Larry 
  wrote:<BR>&gt;Maybe this is a more appropriate topic for the rather silent 
  SourcCitations<BR>list, because really it's an issue (historical/modern names) 
  that's<BR>encountered more often in that area.<BR><BR>John then 
  responded:<BR>&gt;I think the caution of using them can be addressed in the 
  description<BR>(citation detail?) of what the site is. ... can be annotated as 
  "Grave Site<BR>of..." etc.<BR><BR>John and Larry, I can understand the 
  placement of GPS data in a source<BR>citation when one is citing the location 
  of a gravestone in a<BR>cemetery---especially obscure rural cemeteries and 
  large urban ones. But in<BR>the usual discussion of locations, if and when we 
  use GPS coordinates as a<BR>means of pinpointing rural locales or events (such 
  as Michael's proposed<BR>case of birth on a farm), it would seem to me that 
  the information should<BR>not be relegated to source citations. After all, a 
  GPS location is not a<BR>source. The birth or other event is not a source. The 
  GPS would be relevant<BR>to the source only if we were giving the coordinates 
  for the location of the<BR>*repository* (that being the sense in which we use 
  GPS coordinates in a<BR>cemetery citation).<BR><BR>We typically identify 
  locations of events and residences in our narrative,<BR>no? There, we give the 
  legal descriptions of farms, we state the street and<BR>lot numbers for town 
  residences, and we say that country stores were at a<BR>certain crossroad. If 
  we know the precise GPS location for that farm or<BR>residence or country 
  store, why bury the property's GPS location in a source<BR>note that many 
  people don't bother reading?&nbsp; Why not give it parenthetically<BR>in the 
  text, as we might do with any other "current location" for a historic<BR>place 
  whose name has 
  changed?<BR><BR>Elizabeth<BR><BR>----------------------------------------------------------<BR>Elizabeth 
  Shown Mills, CG, CGL, FASG<BR>Tennessee<BR><BR><BR></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>