<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML><HEAD>
<META content="text/html; charset=utf-8" http-equiv=Content-Type>
<META name=GENERATOR content="MSHTML 8.00.6001.18975">
<STYLE></STYLE>
</HEAD>
<BODY bgColor=#ffffff>
<DIV>I've been using only google maps for awhile, and I forgot you can get the 
coordinates simply from the cursor.&nbsp; I usually go to google earth only when 
I want to use one of the sets of overlays I've set up on it.&nbsp; So the 
coordinates obtained while looking at the overlay would be very helpful</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>thanks for the links, I'll try your application.&nbsp; I think using 
coordinates routinely for place names simply opens up a whole realm of 
possibilities later, and as I said previously it also solves the problem of 
referring to locations that have gone (and continue to undergo) name 
changes</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>Larry</DIV>
<BLOCKQUOTE 
style="BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px">
  <DIV style="FONT: 10pt arial">----- Original Message ----- </DIV>
  <DIV 
  style="FONT: 10pt arial; BACKGROUND: #e4e4e4; font-color: black"><B>From:</B> 
  <A title=john@jytangledweb.org href="mailto:john@jytangledweb.org">John</A> 
  </DIV>
  <DIV style="FONT: 10pt arial"><B>To:</B> <A title=apgpubliclist@apgen.org 
  href="mailto:apgpubliclist@apgen.org">apgpubliclist@apgen.org</A> </DIV>
  <DIV style="FONT: 10pt arial"><B>Sent:</B> Monday, October 25, 2010 11:26 
  AM</DIV>
  <DIV style="FONT: 10pt arial"><B>Subject:</B> Re: [APG Public List] [APG 
  Members] place names</DIV>
  <DIV><BR></DIV>I am an advocate of using GPS coordinates. A couple of years 
  ago<BR>I wrote this little Google Map application to assist me. I also<BR>use 
  it to have others pinpoint a location for me.<BR><BR><A 
  href="http://jytangledweb.org/maps/getgps.shtml">http://jytangledweb.org/maps/getgps.shtml</A><BR><BR>And 
  Google Earth is a wonderful application that also lets you<BR>track GPS 
  coordinates of your cursor, it is free and there are<BR>Mac, Windows, and 
  linux versions. See:<BR><BR><A 
  href="http://www.google.com/earth/">http://www.google.com/earth/</A><BR><BR>I've 
  put several GPS mapping projects up on my home web site:<BR><BR><A 
  href="http://jytangledweb.org/">http://jytangledweb.org/</A><BR><BR>John<BR><BR>On 
  10/24/2010 10:15 AM, LBoswell wrote:<BR>&gt; Given multiple options to find 
  and locate gps coordinates in<BR>&gt; longitude/latitude why not use the name 
  as it appears in the document,<BR>&gt; then log it under longitude and 
  latitude.<BR>&gt; Easy enough to find those coordinates simply from google 
  maps. Find the<BR>&gt; location of interest, or as close to the area as 
  possible on google<BR>&gt; maps. Click on link (upper right hand corner next 
  to 'print' and<BR>&gt; 'send'), and copy the result into a text reader or even 
  an email.<BR>&gt; Looks like this:<BR>&gt;<BR>&gt; <A 
  href="http://maps.google.com/maps?q=54.996721,-1.663892&amp;num=1&amp;sll=43.4501,-87.222019&amp;sspn=4.218381,8.195801&amp;ie=UTF8&amp;ll=54.996524,-1.664321&amp;spn=0.00373,0.013036&amp;z=17">http://maps.google.com/maps?q=54.996721,-1.663892&amp;num=1&amp;sll=43.4501,-87.222019&amp;sspn=4.218381,8.195801&amp;ie=UTF8&amp;ll=54.996524,-1.664321&amp;spn=0.00373,0.013036&amp;z=17</A><BR>&gt; 
  &lt;<A 
  href="http://maps.google.com/maps?q=54.996721,-1.663892&amp;num=1&amp;sll=43.4501,-87.222019&amp;sspn=4.218381,8.195801&amp;ie=UTF8&amp;ll=54.996524,-1.664321&amp;spn=0.00373,0.013036&amp;z=17">http://maps.google.com/maps?q=54.996721,-1.663892&amp;num=1&amp;sll=43.4501,-87.222019&amp;sspn=4.218381,8.195801&amp;ie=UTF8&amp;ll=54.996524,-1.664321&amp;spn=0.00373,0.013036&amp;z=17</A>&gt;<BR>&gt;<BR>&gt; 
  The coordinates of interest above are the first ones<BR>&gt; 
  54.996721,-1.663892. Plugging those into the search line on google 
  maps<BR>&gt; will take you to the location (in this case a street in 
  Manchester, UK.<BR>&gt; Those coordinates will never change, unlike the 
  constantly evolving<BR>&gt; names for same location. Most genealogy programs 
  will do the same thing.<BR>&gt;<BR>&gt; When we note a location why aren't we 
  automatically adding the<BR>&gt; coordinates for the benefit of future 
  researchers. Also allows a client<BR>&gt; to pull up google maps and see 
  exactly where the location is/was. Or at<BR>&gt; least the closest modern 
  approximation (if the street doesn't exist, you<BR>&gt; can normally locate 
  its modern location on google maps by<BR>&gt; cross-referencing period sources 
  like maps and gazetteers with the<BR>&gt; modern map).<BR>&gt;<BR>&gt; This 
  has to be the way we go now, it's simply the most exact way to<BR>&gt; 
  pinpoint a location (and it's independent of the past or current 
  name).<BR>&gt; More importantly it can take you to a jurisdictional level 
  location<BR>&gt; (where you select the central point of that jurisdiction and 
  use those<BR>&gt; coordinates), or narrow down to a specific map location. 
  More often now<BR>&gt; you can then overlay that modern location on Google 
  earth with a<BR>&gt; historical map and at the same time have the modern 
  location right in<BR>&gt; front of you. Future researchers will always know 
  what location is being<BR>&gt; referred to, and it's independent of 
  language.<BR>&gt;<BR>&gt; A way of noting locations that a) will never change 
  in the future b).<BR>&gt; allows a unified way to catalogue a location to its 
  various name changes<BR>&gt; over time, and c). is independent of language 
  preferences. Given the<BR>&gt; ease of finding the coordinates for any 
  location on the planet, it just<BR>&gt; makes sense<BR>&gt;<BR>&gt; 
Larry<BR>&gt;</BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>