<html>
<body>
Isn't it possible that the 1880 Census taker got the information from a
neighbor instead of the family themselves?&nbsp; I'm aware of situations,
especially in rural areas, where the census take came by and found no one
at home. They then asked the neighbor who they visited next about the
&quot;missed&quot; family.&nbsp; If the baby was only a few days old the
neighbor might not know what they named the baby.<br><br>
Good luck,<br><br>
Joel<br>
<a href="http://www.rafert.org/home" eudora="autourl">
http://www.rafert.org/home<br><br>
<br>
</a>At 12:59 PM 7/31/2010, Donna McR wrote:<br>
<blockquote type=cite class=cite cite=""><font size=2>Hello
Friends------<br>
</font>&nbsp;<br>
&nbsp;<br>
<font size=2>I often come across a baby recorded as &quot;Nameless&quot;
in censuses.&nbsp; I realize the reasons for doing this.<br>
</font>&nbsp;<br>
&nbsp;<br>
<font size=2>This situation is not &quot;Nameless,&quot; but I think it
may be something akin.<br>
</font>&nbsp;<br>
&nbsp;<br>
<font size=2>The 1880 census of the household of Frank and Sallie Fuller
[names changed for privacy] records a baby named John Fuller as born May
1880.<br>
</font>&nbsp;<br>
<font size=2>A John Fuller of this age never appears again, as far as I
can tell from a thorough census search and search of other family
documents.<br>
</font>&nbsp;<br>
<font size=2>I need to determine reasonably that William Albert Fuller,
also born in May 1880 according to his tombstone, is the son of the
couple above.&nbsp; <i>His parents' will and probate are not available,
and their 1900 census is nowhere to be found (even after a thorough,
downright obsessive search---definitely exhaustive).<br>
</i></font>&nbsp;<br>
<font size=2>In the 1880 census also appears Lena Fuller.&nbsp; In 1910,
I find William Albert (and wife) in the next dwelling listed after Lena,
and a known brother to Lena recorded two dwellings down.<br>
</font>&nbsp;<br>
<font size=2>I have scoured the census of 1880 for another baby named
William Fuller and find none that matches.&nbsp; I have considered that
William Albert Fuller may have been adopted from outside the family and
even re-named, but I find no other male child born that month and year in
the county or surrounding counties.<br>
</font>&nbsp;<br>
<font size=2>A file on the extended family held by the local genealogical
society lists William Albert as Frank and Sallie's son, does not mention
a birth for John Fuller, and makes no note of adoption (although the
creator of the list might have just omitted that).<br>
</font>&nbsp;<br>
<font size=2>I have also looked for a William of the right age living
with other family members in the counties and state from which they
came.&nbsp; No William there.<br>
</font>&nbsp;<br>
<font size=2>The infant John Fuller is recorded in this 1880 census as
having been born in May 1880.&nbsp; William Albert Fuller was born 25 May
1880.&nbsp; The census was taken 2 June 1880.<br>
</font>&nbsp;<br>
<font size=2>This infant's grandfather was named John, and there were
many in the extended family named John, although this particular couple
never had another child named John.<br>
</font>&nbsp;<br>
<font size=2>For William Albert Fuller to be the biological son of Frank
and Sallie, they would have to have changed his name from John Fuller to
William Albert Fuller----or given the eight-days-old baby a temporary
name to satisfy the census taker.<br>
</font>&nbsp;<br>
<font size=2>Do you know of cases when the parents just gave a child a
temporary name for such a record as a census taken a few days after the
child was born?<br>
</font>&nbsp;<br>
&nbsp;<br>
&nbsp;<br>
<font size=2>Warmest Regards,<br>
</font>&nbsp;<br>
<font size=2>Donna<br>
</font>&nbsp;<br>
&nbsp;<br>
&nbsp;<br>
&nbsp;<br>
&nbsp;<br>
&nbsp;<br>
&nbsp;</blockquote></body>
<br>
</html>