<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML><HEAD>
<META content=text/html;charset=iso-8859-1 http-equiv=Content-Type>
<META name=GENERATOR content="MSHTML 8.00.6001.18928"></HEAD>
<BODY 
style="PADDING-LEFT: 10px; PADDING-RIGHT: 10px; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; COLOR: #000000; FONT-SIZE: 10pt; PADDING-TOP: 15px" 
id=MailContainerBody bottomMargin=7 leftMargin=0 rightMargin=7 topMargin=0 
CanvasTabStop="true" name="Compose message area">
<DIV>Regarding giving one dollar in a will:</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>I have seen a will that allotted one dollar (or&nbsp;ten shillings&nbsp;or 
some such) to "any child who comes forth claiming to be an heir."&nbsp;&nbsp;The 
will's maker&nbsp;named his legal children; I supposed he was "covering his 
bases"&nbsp;in case the child of another woman made a claim.&nbsp; I don't know 
if legally that would do, but at least he was expressing his "will" in the 
matter.</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>I love wills, as they often reveal mercurial family dynamics.&nbsp; One man 
willed an equal share to all his sons.&nbsp; The amount to one son, however, was 
to be put in trust administered&nbsp;by another son, who was instructed to give 
the son allowances "should he ever give up gaming and intemperance."</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>A recent project revealed a will of a wealthy&nbsp;fellow&nbsp;with five 
sons, three obviously being favored, as they were mentioned in glowing terms 
multiple times and&nbsp;received an equal share of the man's legacy of land, 
town lots, and money.&nbsp; The&nbsp;fourth was&nbsp;mentioned as having already 
received&nbsp;the share due him&nbsp;(which was&nbsp;only a town lot).&nbsp; The 
interesting part was the fifth son.&nbsp; He had apparently taken&nbsp;a loan 
from his father for his present dwelling place, but had not repaid it.&nbsp; The 
father did not forgive the loan (as&nbsp;one would imagine), but rather set the 
interest retroactively to the time the loan was first made,&nbsp;and gave the 
son two years to pay it off, lest the land return to the estate, to be divided 
among the three favored brothers.</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>And, of course, there is the profligate son-in-law . . . One will 
specifically gives&nbsp;a daughter the portion equal to that of the other 
daughters, to be held&nbsp;by this daughter in trust&nbsp;for the "heirs of her 
body."&nbsp;&nbsp;He specifically named his&nbsp;son-in-law, no doubt a 
rapscallion of some stripe, and said this man&nbsp;had already 
squandered&nbsp;enough of his money and&nbsp;did not deserve another 
shilling.</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>I also love&nbsp;estate&nbsp;inventories.&nbsp; My 3rd great 
grandfather's&nbsp;estate inventory included a Gunter's scale, which was an 
early forerunner to the slide rule.&nbsp; He came to America as a child, an 
indentured servant.&nbsp; No doubt poor and uneducated,&nbsp;he&nbsp;worked in 
his profession of millwright and mechanic to a reputation of some skill.&nbsp; 
He built Thomas Jefferson's first threshing machine from a model Jefferson had 
ordered from the inventor in Scotland (delivered to Jefferson through Thomas 
Pinckney), and then improved on it and built at least one other.&nbsp; He was 
not wealthy, to judge from his estate inventory, but rather a man of&nbsp;a 
respectable working class with&nbsp;modest land ownership.&nbsp; A 
Baptist,&nbsp;he also&nbsp;contributed&nbsp;his little bit to the efforts for 
religious freedom in early Virginia, which he could not have done in his English 
homeland.&nbsp; I say all this to point out that this&nbsp;is the story 
of&nbsp;so many who came to the Colonies and found opportunities out of reach to 
them at home.&nbsp;&nbsp;They set&nbsp;the American pattern we cherish in the 
stories of our families.</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>But I digress, as usual.</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>Warmest Regards,</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>Donna&nbsp;&nbsp;</DIV></BODY></HTML>