<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML><HEAD>
<META content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" http-equiv=Content-Type>
<META name=GENERATOR content="MSHTML 8.00.6001.18928">
<STYLE></STYLE>
</HEAD>
<BODY bgColor=#ffffff>
<DIV>This is actually often&nbsp;true&nbsp;in oral interviews,&nbsp;that people 
will abbreviate information, and shorten the distance between themselves and the 
source (generationally speaking).&nbsp; It's human nature, not intentionally 
lying.&nbsp; It's good story telling.</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><A 
href="http://people.howstuffworks.com/urban-legend2.htm">http://people.howstuffworks.com/urban-legend2.htm</A></DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>But any good interviewer knows how to get around this kind of thing, and 
begin to prove or disprove it.</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>Note that sometimes it will be friend saying "friend of a friend of 
mine".&nbsp; Other times they'll simply drop one generation making it "friend of 
mine".&nbsp; As the article says it's not lying, it's just wanting to be closer 
to the story, a near participant.&nbsp; Or sometimes because the friend believes 
it happened to someone else, it becomes "it happened to me", dropping two links 
in the chain.</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>And then chances are it will remain "friend of a friend".&nbsp; I bet 
someone on the list will say "a friend of a guy on the APG list" sent money 
(dropping one of the generations).</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>as I said, it's one of the pitfalls any interviewer has to watch out for 
(grandparents become the source when they actually heard it from their 
grandparents, and so on)</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>Larry</DIV></BODY></HTML>