I may have missed it, but I haven&#39;t seen any mention on this list of a story that was in _New York_ magazine, 17 May 2010, p. 38-43, about the search for Annie Moore, the first passenger to disembark at Ellis Island. Megan Smolenyak Smolenyak worked extensively on identifying *which* Annie Moore (a common name) this was, and is quoted in the article. Luckily, the entire story is available online, so those of you in other areas can see it: <br>
<a href="http://nymag.com/news/features/65902/">http://nymag.com/news/features/65902/</a><br><br>Be sure to read all the comments as well, as they address some questions, reactions, etc., that I had about the article itself. Although the author makes some errors due to his unfamiliarity with the process and documents of genealogical research, it is very interesting. <br>
<br>With regard to several of Annie&#39;s children dying of what one of the people quoted in the article refers to as &quot;diseases of neglect,&quot; at least one of the comments addresses that. However, also, recently I read a fascinating book by Hasia Diner called _Hungering for America: Italian, Irish, and Jewish Foodways in the Age of Migration_. One of the points she makes about the Irish immigrants is that the majority of them were extremely poor and most had nothing to eat in Ireland but potatoes, so had no concept of how to cook food, what constitutes a nutritious diet, etc. Among other things, this explains the stereotype of the immigrant Irish maid/cook who burned the roast, etc., because these people had no concept of how to prepare the foods they were give. <br>
<br>Christine<br clear="all"><br>-- <br>Christine Crawford-Oppenheimer<br>Hyde Park, NY<br><br>Author of: Long-Distance Genealogy:<br>Researching Your Ancestors from Home<br>