<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML><HEAD>
<META content="text/html; charset=US-ASCII" http-equiv=Content-Type>
<META name=GENERATOR content="MSHTML 8.00.6001.18904"></HEAD>
<BODY style="FONT-FAMILY: Arial; COLOR: #000000; FONT-SIZE: 10pt" id=role_body  bottomMargin=7 leftMargin=7 rightMargin=7 topMargin=7><FONT id=role_document  color=#000000 size=2 face=Arial>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>Hi:&nbsp; I am wondering if anyone knows how to obtain a death certificate 
from the island</DIV>
<DIV>of Anguilla. </DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>Or if anyone would know if there is any genealogy society there that we can 
write to for help.</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>A request to the vital records dept. in Anguilla was not answered or 
acknowledged.</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>Thanks for any ideas.</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>Best regards,</DIV>
<DIV>Sandra Greenberg</DIV>
<DIV>Co-Founder Jewish Genealogical Society of Colorado</DIV>
<DIV>Presently JGSCO Librarian</DIV>
<DIV>APG member</DIV>
<DIV>Denver, CO USA</DIV>
<DIV><A href="mailto:sangreenb@aol.com">sangreenb@aol.com</A></DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>
<DIV>In a message dated 5/7/2010 8:56:41 P.M. Mountain Daylight Time, 
apgpubliclist-request@apgen.org writes:</DIV>
<BLOCKQUOTE  style="BORDER-LEFT: blue 2px solid; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px"><FONT    style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" color=#000000 size=2 face=Arial>Send 
  APGPublicList mailing list submissions to<BR>&nbsp; &nbsp; 
  apgpubliclist@apgen.org<BR><BR>To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide 
  Web, visit<BR>&nbsp; &nbsp; 
  http://mailman.modwest.com/listinfo/apgpubliclist<BR>or, via email, send a 
  message with subject or body 'help' to<BR>&nbsp; &nbsp; 
  apgpubliclist-request@apgen.org<BR><BR>You can reach the person managing the 
  list at<BR>&nbsp; &nbsp; apgpubliclist-owner@apgen.org<BR><BR>When replying, 
  please edit your Subject line so it is more specific<BR>than "Re: Contents of 
  APGPublicList digest..."<BR><BR><BR>Today's Topics:<BR><BR>&nbsp;&nbsp; 1. 
  Revolutionary War privateer research (Ernest Thode)<BR>&nbsp;&nbsp; 2. Re: 
  Online death certificate - citation help (eshown@comcast.net)<BR>&nbsp;&nbsp; 
  3. Re: Online death certificate - citation help 
  (eshown@comcast.net)<BR><BR><BR>----------------------------------------------------------------------<BR><BR>Message: 
  1<BR>Date: Fri, 7 May 2010 22:38:20 -0400<BR>From: Ernest Thode 
  &lt;ernestthode@gmail.com&gt;<BR>Subject: [APG Public List] Revolutionary War 
  privateer research<BR>To: apgpubliclist@apgen.org<BR>Message-ID:<BR>&nbsp; 
  &nbsp; 
  &lt;AANLkTimOATJAfBRo8Msj9cPcNWiQJ-Dz9jHlrQRaKw6m@mail.gmail.com&gt;<BR>Content-Type: 
  text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"<BR><BR>Hello,<BR><BR>My question has to do 
  with Dr. Jabez True, born Hampstead, NH, who served as<BR>a surgeon on a 
  vessel from Newburyport, MA, that was shipwrecked somewhere<BR>on the coast of 
  the Netherlands during the Revolutionary War, was welcomed<BR>by the Dutch 
  people and stayed there until the end of hostilities, then<BR>to Gilmanton, 
  NH, where he studied medicine with a Dr. Flagg, until 1788,<BR>when he came as 
  an early settler of Marietta, OH, where he then served as a<BR>surgeon at Fort 
  Harmar and teacher at Campus Martius.<BR><BR>How can I document his privateer 
  service?&nbsp; This was not with a military<BR>unit, but it served the cause 
  of the colonists.<BR><BR>How can I find the ship's name or the captain's 
  list?<BR><BR>Ernie Thode<BR>Local History &amp; Genealogy 
  Libraria<BR>Marietta, OH<BR>-------------- next part --------------<BR>An HTML 
  attachment was scrubbed...<BR>URL: 
  &lt;../../20100507/308bdd47/attachment-0001.htm&gt;<BR><BR>------------------------------<BR><BR>Message: 
  2<BR>Date: Fri, 7 May 2010 20:16:18 -0500<BR>From: 
  &lt;eshown@comcast.net&gt;<BR>Subject: Re: [APG Public List] Online death 
  certificate - citation<BR>&nbsp; &nbsp; help<BR>To: 
  &lt;apgpubliclist@apgen.org&gt;<BR>Message-ID: 
  &lt;033401caee4c$105c4c90$3114e5b0$@net&gt;<BR>Content-Type: text/plain; 
  charset="us-ascii"<BR><BR>Susan,<BR><BR>I'm weighing in late, for all the 
  reasons you might suppose. In the<BR>meanwhile, several of you have chewed and 
  digested the issues even more than<BR>I would have.&nbsp; First, I'll comment 
  here on the broader points that you<BR>question.<BR><BR>1.<BR>Your first 
  example, in your original posting, is spot on for digital images<BR>that you 
  consult at a website. The only modification I'd suggest would be 
  to<BR>italicize the name of the website, following the principle that 
  publications<BR>are italicized. That helps your reader to know what all the 
  various parts of<BR>your citation represent. (And, of course, your e-mail 
  system turned the URL<BR>into a hotlink and underlined it, which we would not 
  do in a typical<BR>citation.)<BR><BR>2.<BR>You puzzle over the differences in 
  the models you followed for your first<BR>and second examplea, saying, "The 
  first variation treats the digital image<BR>as an image copy; and I think the 
  second variation treats it as a<BR>publication." <BR><BR>Your surmise about 
  the first variation is correct. Your second does miss the<BR>point. Look again 
  at 9.33 (p. 459).&nbsp; Here you will find models for citing<BR>vital record 
  information gleaned online. Note that the citations are divided<BR>into two 
  groups, with the following labels used as headers for the two<BR>groups 
  (italics are added below for emphasis):<BR><BR>.&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; 
  &nbsp;&nbsp; "Citing database entries"<BR>.&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp; 
  "Citing image copies of certificates"<BR><BR>These two labels (which are used 
  often throughout EE) spotlight the<BR>difference between the two formats. Your 
  second example took a format for<BR>citing databases and used it to cite 
  images. There are different needs and<BR>considerations when handling each of 
  these. The image depicts the actual<BR>record created by the official agency. 
  The database's<BR>abstract/transcript/index-entry/whatever is a different 
  creation, one<BR>produced by the database publisher. Ergo, <BR><BR>.&nbsp; 
  &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp; if you are citing the database material, you lead 
  with a citation<BR>to the database. You say you are using the database. Then 
  you i.d. the<BR>specific detail that you took from the database and add 
  whatever 'citation'<BR>the website gives you for where it got that 
  data.<BR>.&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp; If you are citing the image, you 
  lead with a citation to the<BR>image. You say you are using the image. Then 
  you i.d. the website at which<BR>you accessed that image and you add whatever 
  'citation' the website gives<BR>you for where it got that image.<BR><BR>As you 
  know, the EE examples for online vital records cite the official<BR>agency 
  website for these records. Your situation is slightly different.<BR>Rather 
  than accessing the images at the official site, you accessed them at<BR>the 
  FamilySearch Record Search, which introduces a few other quirks into 
  a<BR>citation. I don't know whether you're working from the first or 
  second<BR>edition of EE, but&nbsp; issues surrounding the use of images and 
  database<BR>entries at FamilySearch Record Search are discussed, with 
  examples, in the<BR>second edition at pp. 53, 469, 500-01, 598-99.<BR><BR>More 
  to come (if life cooperates J).<BR><BR>Elizabeth<BR><BR>Elizabeth Shown Mills, 
  CG, CGL, FASG<BR>Hendersonville, TN <BR><BR><BR>From: 
  apgpubliclist-bounces+eshown=comcast.net@apgen.org<BR>[mailto:apgpubliclist-bounces+eshown=comcast.net@apgen.org] 
  On Behalf Of<BR>Susan G. Johnston<BR>Sent: Friday, May 07, 2010 7:35 PM<BR>To: 
  apgpubliclist@apgen.org<BR>Subject: Re: [APG Public List] Online death 
  certificate - citation help<BR><BR>...&nbsp; I think the principle I'm trying 
  to conceptualize in my own mind is<BR>something that would help me decide when 
  to place the emphasis on the<BR>original document (citation example 1) and 
  when to place the emphasis on the<BR>website (citation example 2).&nbsp; I 
  know there's an art involved, but the<BR>scientist in me says that I should be 
  able to identify some general<BR>principles that usually govern when this 
  choice comes up.&nbsp; In fact, as your<BR>quotation below points out, one 
  needs to learn the principles of citation<BR>before artistic license comes 
  into play.<BR><BR>Here is how I decide -- if it is an image (of anything), 
  first cite what the<BR>image shows, then where it came from.<BR><BR>That is 
  what I was doing with the Ohio death certificates on FamilySearch,<BR>too - 
  until I began studying the QuickSheet on citing Ancestry.com databases<BR>and 
  images and saw how often images were treated as publications - 
  basically<BR>author/creator (frequently omitted because duplicated in the 
  website title),<BR>"chapter title"/"database", book/website author/creator 
  (frequently omitted<BR>because duplicated in the website title), book/website 
  title (publication<BR>place/URL : date), pages/specific image information; 
  credit line.&nbsp; Then, I<BR>began to wonder if I should be doing the same 
  thing with the Ohio death<BR>certificates.&nbsp; After all, they are 
  publications - in fact, they're actually<BR>like reprints: digital 
  publications of microfilm publications.<BR><BR><BR><BR>Likewise, to take this 
  a small step further, records from the National<BR>Archives first cite the 
  specific record, then broaden the citation outward,<BR>to the particular 
  collection, then the record group, then the repository (if<BR>I am not 
  skipping a step there somewhere).<BR><BR>My understanding is that this format 
  - Document ID, date, file unit,<BR>subseries, series, subgroup, record group, 
  repository - is more standard for<BR>archival manuscript material; and of 
  course, this format may vary depending<BR>on the citation format preferred by 
  the relevant archives.&nbsp; It is what I was<BR>doing for online images, too; 
  I simply started questioning whether that was<BR>the best practice.&nbsp; 
  <BR><BR>Evidence Explained does seem to give us permission to choose, and 
  I<BR>appreciate your sharing your reasoning for your 
  choice.<BR><BR>Regards,<BR>Susan Johnston<BR><BR>-------------- next part 
  --------------<BR>An HTML attachment was scrubbed...<BR>URL: 
  &lt;../../20100507/29663644/attachment-0001.htm&gt;<BR><BR>------------------------------<BR><BR>Message: 
  3<BR>Date: Fri, 7 May 2010 21:28:46 -0500<BR>From: 
  &lt;eshown@comcast.net&gt;<BR>Subject: Re: [APG Public List] Online death 
  certificate - citation<BR>&nbsp; &nbsp; help<BR>To: 
  &lt;apgpubliclist@apgen.org&gt;<BR>Message-ID: 
  &lt;033c01caee56$301fa9a0$905efce0$@net&gt;<BR>Content-Type: text/plain; 
  charset="us-ascii"<BR><BR>Susan also wrote:<BR>&gt;I think the principle I'm 
  trying to conceptualize in my own mind is<BR>something that would help me 
  decide when to place the emphasis on the<BR>original document (citation 
  example 1) and when to place the emphasis on the<BR>website (citation example 
  2).&nbsp; I know there's an art involved, but the<BR>scientist in me says that 
  I should be able to identify some general<BR>principles that usually govern 
  when this choice comes up.&nbsp; In fact, as your<BR>quotation below points 
  out, one needs to learn the principles of citation<BR>before artistic license 
  comes into play.<BR><BR>Susan, I hope my last response clarified 
  this.<BR><BR>&gt;Here is how I decide -- if it is an image (of anything), 
  first cite what<BR>the image shows, then where it came from.<BR>&gt;That is 
  what I was doing with the Ohio death certificates on FamilySearch,<BR>too - 
  until I began studying the QuickSheet on citing Ancestry.com databases<BR>and 
  images and saw how often images were treated as publications - 
  basically<BR>author/creator (frequently omitted because duplicated in the 
  website title),<BR>"chapter title"/"database", book/website author/creator 
  (frequently omitted<BR>because duplicated in the website title), book/website 
  title (publication<BR>place/URL : date), pages/specific image information; 
  credit line.&nbsp; Then, I<BR>began to wonder if I should be doing the same 
  thing with the Ohio death<BR>certificates.&nbsp; After all, they are 
  publications - in fact, they're actually<BR>like reprints: digital 
  publications of microfilm publications.<BR><BR>You've fingered a definite 
  issue that exists when using Ancestry, Footnote,<BR>and other large sites that 
  offer many different collections--as opposed to a<BR>relatively small site 
  that presents its own records and identifies them<BR>fully, such as the state- 
  or county-level vital records offices.<BR><BR>One of the first things we 
  notice when we analyze offerings at the large<BR>sites, as well as the 
  citations they give to their own sources, is that they<BR>often change the 
  title of the collection that they have digitized. A second<BR>thing we notice 
  is that they often (very often!) do not give us all the<BR>information we need 
  to find the original at NARA (or wherever else they<BR>digitized the 
  material).&nbsp; <BR><BR>Consequently, even when we use an image, the citation 
  often can't lead with<BR>a correction identification of the original record. 
  Under these<BR>circumstances, the surest way to make sure that the record is 
  relocatable<BR>there at Ancestry/Footnote/SimilarSite, is to follow this 
  pattern:<BR><BR>-&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp; cite the collection name that the 
  website uses<BR>-&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp; identify it as digital images from 
  Ancestry/Footnote/SimilarSite<BR>-&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp; add URL &amp; 
  date, <BR>-&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp; identify the document<BR>-&nbsp; &nbsp; 
  &nbsp;&nbsp; add whatever 'citation' the site gives for the source of its 
  source.<BR><BR><BR>For example (drawing a "Reference Note" from the Ancestry 
  Quicksheet):<BR><BR>&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp; 2.&nbsp; "Civil War Prisoner of War 
  Records, 1861-1865," digital images,<BR>Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com 
  : accessed 22 January 2009),<BR>unidentified manuscript register, p. 308, 
  headed "New Orleans, La., Roll of<BR>Prisoners of War," entry for Louis 
  Rachal; citing National Archives<BR>microfilm publication Selected Records of 
  the War Department Relating to<BR>Confederate Prisoners of War, 1861-1865, 
  M598, roll 3.<BR><BR>Obviously from the above, there is no way that we could 
  give a correct<BR>citation to the original NARA document. Instead, for 
  relocation purposes, we<BR>have to cite the Ancestry collection in which the 
  digital image is found,<BR>then we identify/describe the actual record as best 
  we can from the<BR>information supplied to us---followed by a notation of the 
  incomplete<BR>citation that Ancestry provides.<BR><BR><BR>&gt;Likewise, to 
  take this a small step further, records from the National<BR>Archives first 
  cite the specific record, then broaden the citation outward,<BR>to the 
  particular collection, then the record group, then the repository (if<BR>I am 
  not skipping a step there somewhere).<BR><BR>This, of course, is the point I 
  just made. We can't cite the NARA document<BR>because there are several pieces 
  of information we would need. As explained<BR>at 11.1, a NARA citation calls 
  for the following items, which NARA needs<BR>cited in exactly this 
  order:<BR><BR>-&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp; Item of interest, with relevant 
  names, item description, dates, page<BR>numbers<BR>-&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp; 
  File Unit Name, date (or inclusive dates);<BR>-&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp; 
  Series Name, inclusive dates;<BR>-&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp; Subgroup Name, 
  inclusive dates;<BR>-&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp; Record Group Name, inclusive 
  dates, record group number; and<BR>-&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp; Archive, 
  location.<BR><BR>&gt;My understanding is that this format - Document ID, date, 
  file unit,<BR>subseries, series, subgroup, record group, repository - is more 
  standard for<BR>archival manuscript material; and of course, this format may 
  vary depending<BR>on the citation format preferred by the relevant archives. 
  <BR><BR>Yes. EE 3.1 (pp. 116-18) covers this. It is the format long used 
  for<BR>reference notes by national, state, and academic archives in the U.S. 
  It's<BR>not the format that has been typically used for local government 
  materials<BR>in the U.S. and it's not the format conventionally used 
  throughout most of<BR>Europe.<BR><BR>Elizabeth<BR><BR>Elizabeth Shown Mills, 
  CG, CGL, FASG<BR><BR>-------------- next part --------------<BR>An HTML 
  attachment was scrubbed...<BR>URL: 
  &lt;../../20100507/677feccb/attachment.htm&gt;<BR><BR>End 
  of APGPublicList Digest, Vol 7, Issue 
  5<BR>*******************************************<BR></FONT></BLOCKQUOTE></DIV></FONT></BODY></HTML>