<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML><HEAD>
<META content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" http-equiv=Content-Type>
<META name=GENERATOR content="MSHTML 8.00.6001.18904">
<STYLE></STYLE>
</HEAD>
<BODY bgColor=#ffffff>
<DIV><FONT size=2 face=Arial>My two cents also:</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT size=2 face=Arial></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT size=2 face=Arial>I think there is still a place and a need&nbsp;for 
all these local genealogical societies but as with all things they have to keep 
up with the times to be effective.&nbsp; IMO here are some things a society 
could do to increase their visibility and possible member base:&nbsp;&nbsp;have 
a&nbsp;group on Facebook where members and interested&nbsp;non-members could 
communicate and possibly ask questions.&nbsp; For sure have a website and use it 
to showcase and share&nbsp;their holdings.&nbsp;&nbsp; Have a blog which could 
augment their quarterly publication and possibly &nbsp;modeled after the Eastman 
blog, where some of the content is free and the really good stuff is by 
subscription. The cost involved in getting something like this up and running is 
quickly recouped by saving postage and paper supplies.&nbsp; These are just a 
few thoughts, I'm sure there are lots more.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT size=2 face=Arial></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT size=2 face=Arial>BTW, I really enjoy reading these maillist.&nbsp; 
Thank you to all of you who contribute and share your expertise with the rest of 
us.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT size=2 face=Arial></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT size=2 face=Arial>Researching in Arizona,</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT size=2 face=Arial>Jo </FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT size=2 face=Arial></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT size=2 face=Arial></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<BLOCKQUOTE 
style="BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px">
  <DIV style="FONT: 10pt arial">----- Original Message ----- </DIV>
  <DIV 
  style="FONT: 10pt arial; BACKGROUND: #e4e4e4; font-color: black"><B>From:</B> 
  <A title=joelsr@gmail.com href="mailto:joelsr@gmail.com">Joel S. Russell</A> 
  </DIV>
  <DIV style="FONT: 10pt arial"><B>To:</B> <A title=bradleyjohnny32@hotmail.com 
  href="mailto:bradleyjohnny32@hotmail.com">Johnny Bradley</A> ; <A 
  title=nancyml@comcast.net 
  href="mailto:nancyml@comcast.net">nancyml@comcast.net</A> ; <A 
  title=apgpubliclist@apgen.org 
  href="mailto:apgpubliclist@apgen.org">apgpubliclist@apgen.org</A> </DIV>
  <DIV style="FONT: 10pt arial"><B>Sent:</B> Tuesday, April 06, 2010 11:40 
  AM</DIV>
  <DIV style="FONT: 10pt arial"><B>Subject:</B> Re: [APG Public List] 
  Genealogical Societies</DIV>
  <DIV><BR></DIV>I'm going to throw in my two cents.<BR><BR>I've been involved 
  in genealogy for over 30 years and I've been a member of numerous genealogical 
  societies across the country.&nbsp; Originally it was the only place to find 
  others also interested in genealogy with whom to talk and get advice 
  from.&nbsp; It was also the point of contact when I had research in a 
  particular locality in which I didn't live.&nbsp; The Internet now allows me 
  to find many more people interested in genealogy.&nbsp; People who are 
  researching the same or similar areas or families that I am.&nbsp; There is 
  also a lot of information (including a tremendous amount of bad information) 
  available from on-line resources.&nbsp; Also, for a person like me who joined 
  societies in other parts of the country, I relied on that periodical 
  publication to assist my research and post queries.&nbsp; I can now post a 
  query anytime of day or night and reach a much larger audience.&nbsp; Finally, 
  and this again is just my experience, the majority of societies that I 
  belonged to had no interest in using the Internet or finding out ways it could 
  enhance the society.&nbsp; Instead they ignored it and saw it only as a 
  threat.<BR><BR>I'm still a member of a couple of societies, but only ones 
  local to me in which I can attend a meeting. <BR><BR>Joel<BR><A 
  href="http://www.rafert.org/home" 
  eudora="autourl">http://www.rafert.org/home<BR><BR><BR><BR></A>At 02:19 PM 
  4/6/2010, Johnny Bradley wrote:<BR>
  <BLOCKQUOTE class=cite cite="" type="cite">Hello All,<BR>&nbsp;<BR>I am the 
    president of our genealogical society here in Mississippi County, Missouri. 
    The society has existed for about 25+ years. After I joined twelve years 
    ago, the few members who were with the group told me that there just was not 
    as much interest. At one time we had 60 to 70 members and most of them were 
    from outside this area. We are now at the point that we no longer have 
    meetings and have stopped publishing our MUDDY ROOTS quarterly 
    magazine.<BR>&nbsp;<BR>My opinion is that people have other things they 
    would rather be doing. Also, the society we live in now, people have 
    schedules, work hours are different and the digital age in which people 
    think they can just sit down in front of there computer and find all of 
    there ancestry.<BR>&nbsp;<BR>Johnny Bradley<BR>President-Mississippi County 
    Genealogical Society, MO.<BR>&nbsp;<BR>&gt; From: 
    nancyml@comcast.net<BR>&gt; Date: Mon, 5 Apr 2010 17:19:15 -0400<BR>&gt; To: 
    apgpubliclist@apgen.org<BR>&gt; Subject: [APG Public List] Genealogical 
    Societies<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; Although this question is not directly about 
    genealogical procedures or<BR>&gt; methodology, I wanted to ask the group 
    what genealogical societies they have<BR>&gt; observed that have a done a 
    particularly effective job in the area of<BR>&gt; membership development, 
    and how they have done it. <BR>&gt; Many thanks,<BR>&gt; Nancy Menton 
    Lyons<BR>&gt; Delaware<BR><BR>
    <HR>
    Hotmail is redefining busy with tools for the New Busy. Get more from your 
    inbox. <A 
    href="http://www.windowslive.com/campaign/thenewbusy?ocid=PID28326::T:WLMTAGL:ON:WL:en-US:WM_HMP:042010_2">See 
    how.</A> </BLOCKQUOTE><BR></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>