I think this topic has been most thoroughly chewed over.<br><br>Valerie<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Sat, Feb 20, 2010 at 9:54 AM,  <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:eshown@comcast.net">eshown@comcast.net</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;"><div class="im"><br>
I wrote:<br>
&gt;As a professional researcher, my experience in this area has been that of<br>
</div>Ray&#39;s ... most enquirers intent upon proving Native American ancestry<br>
<div class="im">perceive a financial gain to be derived from it, rarely suspect the hundreds<br>
or thousands of hours it might take to find a connection, and ultimately<br>
discover that the connection is so far back in time that it does not qualify<br>
them for tribal membership, free college tuition, or casino shares.<br>
&gt; But, as a personal quest, I, too, would call the effort a passion!<br>
<br>
</div>Larry responded<br>
<div class="im">&gt;I just find it hard to accept that any astute professional, experienced<br>
researcher would think that there was any great financial gain to be made<br>
from doing genealogical research, no matter what the subject.<br>
<br>
<br>
</div>Larry, the expectation of financial gain, of which I wrote, was not at all<br>
an expectation that the *professional genealogist* would reap great<br>
financial gain. Certainly no &quot;astute professional&quot; I know expects &quot;great<br>
financial gain to be made from doing genealogical research.&quot; To the<br>
contrary, it has been the client who has expected to reap financial gain<br>
from the results of the genealogical search.<br>
<br>
Elizabeth<br>
<br>
<br>
</blockquote></div><br>