It seems to me we might offer potential clients several categories:<br><br>1. Terribly passionate but inexperienced; willing to put passion aside<br><br>2. Terribly experienced but impassive; money-grubbing<br><br>3. Not only experienced but driven by passion for YOUR area<br>
<br>4. Inexperienced, blase, and only in it for the money, but quite cheerful<br><br><br><br>Valerie<br><br>P.S. PLEASE know that this is tongue-in-cheek. I watched too much Monty Python as a child.<br><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">
On Fri, Feb 19, 2010 at 6:24 PM, LBoswell <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:laboswell@rogers.com">laboswell@rogers.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
That said, I do have a passion for any kind of research centered on London. Or military research.  Certain areas of the colonial period.  And I light up when I pick up a project that takes me to those places/eras.  But that&#39;s a personal thing, not my professional approach.  Once the professional research starts I set the passion aside.  I have to, otherwise it would trip me up.<br>

<br>
Left to my own devices I&#39;d be sitting pouring over maps of London, chasing down obscure references, and so on.  Happy as the proverbial hog in....<br>
<br>
Passion that you can literally feel.  Wonderful.  But kept in its place.<br>
<br>
Larry <br>
</blockquote></div><br>