<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">I had meant for this to go the public list, not to Ida personally. But I like her reply, and she asked me to share it.--Craig K<br><div><br><div>Begin forwarded message:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px;"><span style="font-family:'Helvetica'; font-size:medium; color:rgba(0, 0, 0, 1);"><b>From: </b></span><span style="font-family:'Helvetica'; font-size:medium;">Ida Skarson McCormick &lt;<a href="mailto:idamc@seanet.com">idamc@seanet.com</a>&gt;<br></span></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px;"><span style="font-family:'Helvetica'; font-size:medium; color:rgba(0, 0, 0, 1);"><b>Date: </b></span><span style="font-family:'Helvetica'; font-size:medium;">November 23, 2009 2:24:30 PM EST<br></span></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px;"><span style="font-family:'Helvetica'; font-size:medium; color:rgba(0, 0, 0, 1);"><b>To: </b></span><span style="font-family:'Helvetica'; font-size:medium;">Craig Kilby &lt;<a href="mailto:persisto@live.com">persisto@live.com</a>&gt;<br></span></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px;"><span style="font-family:'Helvetica'; font-size:medium; color:rgba(0, 0, 0, 1);"><b>Subject: </b></span><span style="font-family:'Helvetica'; font-size:medium;"><b>Re: [APG Public List] Nickname question [Jane -&gt; Jincy -&gt; Incy]</b><br></span></div><br><div>Craig:<br><br>"Incy" is almost certainly Jane. It seems Henry-1 Towles is too young to be the husband of Elizabeth. I think you are probably right that he married Jane "Incy." Elizabeth's father could have provided for her for some other reason than marriage. I have a case spelled out in great detail in the father's will providing for his disabled daughter.<br><br>In the absence of additional information, I would say it is most likely Elizabeth married someone else. By jumping to the conclusion that Elizabeth married Henry, researchers have probably not looked further for other evidence.<br><br>The person who recorded the will may not have been able to read the original handwriting very well and took a stab at it. Or could the Iner be Ince? Those letters can look very similar. This would mean that neither Nottingham or Neal accurately transcribed the name as written.<br><br>Since you sent this reply to me privately, you may want to post it to the list for additional feedback.<br><br>--Ida<br><br><br>At 10:12 AM 11/23/2009, Craig Kilby wrote:<br><blockquote type="cite">Thanks for far for all the feedback. Believe I'm struggling with this handwriting and whether it is a "J" or an "I". Stratton Nottingham transcribed the name as "Jane" while Rosemary Corley Neal transcribed it as "Incy."<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">The 1670 will of her father, John Stockley is the only time or place she is ever mentioned in any record I have found. I have the recorded copy of it (from micofilm, which isn't helping matters.) I honestly think it looks like INER.<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">It is easy to compare the "I" from the repeated use of the word "ITEM" at each clause of the will against the "J" for John. They do not look the same. But I must say it isn't easy to even say that much. The handwriting is not the worst I've ever encountered, but it's not great.<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">I may as well expand on the problem at hand. The 1670 will of John Stockley names unmarried daughters "Incy/Jane/Iner", Hanna and Ann, and another daughter Elizabeth he says he has previously provided for. Most have assumed that she was married by this time, though the will does not say this and does not give her a last name, nor mention any husband.<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">And THIS is the problem. People have since assumed that this daughter Elizabeth married Henry-1 Towles by 1670. I am finding that very hard to believe. He does not show up in Accomack County until 1680, where he remains for the rest of his life. In 1670, he was only 19 years old (his birth year about 1651 due a deposition he made in 1691 that he was aged 40 or thereabouts.)<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">There is no doubt that Henry Towles married A DAUGHTER of John Stockley, but which one? I don't think it can be Elizabeth. And it is not Hanna and it is not Ann, who are both named in the 1697 will of their mother Elizabeth, by this time widow of John Stratton. In addition to these two daughters and/or their children, she names the five sons of Henry Towles. She does not name HIM and does NOT call them her grandchildren, but it is pretty obvious who they are.<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">I have studied two of the five sons in more detail, Henry-2 and Stockley-2 Towles. Both men had daughters named Elizabeth, Ann, Judith and JANE.<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">So, the problem and hopefully a solution is that the INCY in the 1670 will is really JANE, who is the really the first wife of Henry Towles. &nbsp;(He was married to an Elizabeth by 1692 but she outlived him and remarried, and had at least one daughter by Henry Towles who is NOT named in the will of Elizabeth Stratton.)<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">OK...probably far too much detail but I thought I may as well spell out the entire problem.<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">Craig K<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">On Nov 23, 2009, at 12:08 PM, Ida Skarson McCormick wrote:<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">&gt; At 08:27 AM 11/23/2009, Craig Kilby wrote:<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">&gt;&gt; I am having a devil of a time reconciling a problem, and I need your help. The question really boils down to just this: Is *Incy* a nickname for *Jane*?<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">&gt;&gt;<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">&gt;&gt; The time frame in question is 1670 to 1700 in Accomack County Virginia. I can provide more details if needed but this really is the gist of the problem.<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">&gt;<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">&gt; Craig:<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">&gt;<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">&gt; The more common Southern nickname for Jane was Jincy. In New England it was Jenny. The -cy and -sy nicknames were more popular in the South.<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">&gt;<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">&gt; Incy makes sense because at that time J and I could still be considered the same letter in the 24-character English alphabet. "Four and twenty blackbirds baked in a pie [movable type]...."<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">&gt;<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">&gt; According to a footnoted article in Wikipedia: "The first English-language book to make a clear distinction between I and J was published in 1634." However, I have seen I used in place of J as late as the 1790 US census. It would not be surprising to see this usage linger on. As Samuel L. Brown put it, names are "the fossils of speech."<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">&gt;<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">&gt; --Ida Skarson McCormick, <a href="mailto:idamc@seanet.com">idamc@seanet.com</a>, Seattle<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">&gt; _______________________________________________<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">&gt; APG Public Mailing List<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">&gt; <a href="http://apgen.org/publications/publiclist/">http://apgen.org/publications/publiclist/</a><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">&gt;<br></blockquote><br><br></div></blockquote></div><br></body></html>