<p>Any manuscripts that have never been published in the United States (which means made available for the public to purchase a copy of&nbsp;via some type of medium) is in the public domain IF it was created more than 120 years ago (in the case of a work of corporate authorship or a work-for-hire),&nbsp;or 70 years after the death of the author (if not a work of corporate authorship or a work for hire).&nbsp; So a creatively-written&nbsp;genealogical entry in a family Bible written 100 years ago by someone then aged 12, who just kicked the bucket yesterday at age 112, will not be in the public domain for another 70 years.&nbsp; To publish that entry word-for-word, or putting an image of that page online&nbsp;requires the permission of the deceased's heirs unless you feel that your use constitutes Fair Use, in which case the heirs could theoretically&nbsp;sue and a judge would decide whether in fact your use was Fair Use.&nbsp; Merely abstracting the facts from the Bible entry is not a violation of the copyright, since facts cannot be copyrighted.&nbsp; Obviously, it is highly unlike that the heirs would sue, since, unless the person was somehow famous, it is unlikely that any monetary damages were suffered by the deceased's estate.&nbsp; The same rules that apply to unpublished manuscripts apply to photographs taken by family members who are not professional photographers.&nbsp;&nbsp;Copyright persists until 70 years after the photographer dies, and thus anyone making copies of those photographs or placing them online without getting permission of the estate of the deceased could theoretically be sued for copyright infringement.<br /><br />Carl raised the question of an unpublished church register from the 17th century.&nbsp;&nbsp; Since the church register is located somewhere, the person or institution that has it can impose whatever rules are desired regarding access to it.&nbsp; A researcher might have to agree to something like "as consideration for being granted access to the manuscript, I agree not to publish it."&nbsp; This is a legally binding contract that courts could enforce, even if the manuscript in question is in the public domain.<br /><br />Okay, suppose that the institution has granted you permission to publish a facsimile edition of the entire manuscript.&nbsp; This means that you use some type of photographic means to take an image of each page and you go to tremendous effort to make each page of the resulting book as close as possible to the original manuscript.&nbsp; Can you copyright your facsimile edition?&nbsp; No.&nbsp; Even if the repository has no issues, you cannot copyright something that is merely a replica of something that is in the public domain.&nbsp; It doesn't matter how much "effort" you put into creating something; what the courts have held is how much "creativity" something required.&nbsp; The courts view that operating something like a camera or a photocopier requires little to no creativity when the objective is to slavishly reproduce the original.&nbsp; Baring any contractural restrictions placed on you by the repository, you will be free to sell your facsimile edition, but anyone else would be able to copy your edition and sell it also at a lower price than yours.&nbsp; All you would get from it would be the revenue from the one copy you sold to that other party.<br /><br />Second Scenario: The institution lets you do whatever you want, and you use your paleography skills to create an exact&nbsp;transcription of the manuscript.&nbsp; This is a little more of a gray area, but likely still could not be copyrighted, although whatever material you add that is not in the original, such as annotations, footnotes, and introductory matter certainly can be copyrighted.<br /><br />Third Scenario.&nbsp; The register was in Latin, which you translated into English, as well as re-arranging it creatively into a spreadsheet.&nbsp; That spreadsheet is copyrighted.&nbsp; But the facts in the spreadsheet are not.&nbsp; Thus, someone else would be free to create their own spreadsheet from your spreadsheet, so long as they did not copy your arrangement of the facts, or any creatively written explanatory text, footnotes, etc.<br /><br />Fourth Scenario.&nbsp; You translate the register, publish&nbsp;your translation, and start selling it.&nbsp; You have copyright to it.&nbsp; But suppose someone else later went to the repository holding the original and made their own translation FROM THAT ORIGINAL.&nbsp; They could also copyright and sell their version of it.&nbsp; They could have even used your version as an aid in creating their version as long as it was done so within the bounds of Fair Use.<br /><br />Disclaimer:&nbsp; I am not a lawyer, so what I just wrote is not legal advice.<br /><br />Chad Milliner, AG, MLIS</p>