<html><body><span style="font-family:Verdana; color:#000000; font-size:10pt;"><div>The simplest way would be through a contract with&nbsp;whoever (author, publisher, etc.)&nbsp;has the requisite rights.</div>
<div>&nbsp;</div>
<div>Jack Butler&nbsp;</div>
<div>&nbsp;</div>
<BLOCKQUOTE style="BORDER-LEFT: blue 2px solid; PADDING-LEFT: 8px; FONT-FAMILY: verdana; COLOR: black; MARGIN-LEFT: 8px; FONT-SIZE: 10pt" webmail="1">
<div   >-------- Original Message --------<BR>Subject: [APG Public List] How does Ancestry.com do this?<BR>From: Craig Kilby &lt;persisto1@gmail.com&gt;<BR>Date: Thu, October 08, 2009 7:56 pm<BR>To: APG APG Public &lt;apgpubliclist@apgen.org&gt;<BR><BR>(I first sent this using a different email address which of course <BR>bounced back)<BR><BR>&gt; I have a question I hope some of you can ask. How can ancestry.com <BR>&gt; put books that are still under copyright and still for sale from the <BR>&gt; publisher (in this case a book copyrighted in 2003 and still for <BR>&gt; sale from Genealogical Publishing Company) on their web site free to <BR>&gt; subscribers? How does this work? Maybe ESM, as an author published <BR>&gt; by the GPC label could explain it for me.<BR>&gt;<BR>&gt; Craig Kilby<BR><BR>_______________________________________________<BR>APG Public Mailing List<BR><a href="http://apgen.org/publications/publiclist/" target=_blank>http://apgen.org/publications/publiclist/</a><BR></DIV></BLOCKQUOTE></span></body></html>