<div>On Mon, Oct 5, 2009 at 5:30 AM, Suzanne Johnston <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:suemj@verizon.net">suemj@verizon.net</a>&gt;</span> wrote about Carolyn&#39;s comments:</div>
<div><br> </div>
<blockquote style="BORDER-LEFT: #ccc 1px solid; MARGIN: 0px 0px 0px 0.8ex; PADDING-LEFT: 1ex" class="gmail_quote">However, I do disagree with your thoughts on problem-solving lectures. I<br>would attend the type of lecture you describe and I think there are<br>

others who would do the same. New ideas should be tried at national<br>conferences. One or two of this type of presentation could be done for<br>one or two years; if they all fall flat, they would be discontinued. How<br>

can anyone predict attendance for this type of lecture without trying it<br>at least once? Don&#39;t we read the NSG Quarterly, or TAG, or TG, or NEHGR,<br>even when the article doesn&#39;t discuss our geographic area of interest or<br>

our family?</blockquote>
<div> </div>
<div>Susie,</div>
<div> </div>
<div>I&#39;m in agreement with you. As I stated before, the best lecture I ever attended was by Helen Leary who covered a case study. This is not a new idea. I do think the draw for many of us is the methodology and has nothing to do with the ethnicity or region being researched. We have an ever-evolving effort to think outside of the box. When I heard Helen, I had never written a research report or taken a client. Listening to her go through a difficult case blew me away. Absolutely fascinating.</div>


<div> </div>
<div>Rondina<br><br></div>