<div> </div>
<div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, Oct 5, 2009 at 1:01 PM, Richard A. Pence <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:richardpence@pipeline.com" target="_blank">richardpence@pipeline.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote style="BORDER-LEFT: #ccc 1px solid; MARGIN: 0px 0px 0px 0.8ex; PADDING-LEFT: 1ex" class="gmail_quote">Everyone seems to be losing sight of the essential point here. What you are<br>talking about is an INDEX not a literal transcription. If an attempt is made<br>

to assist you in finding the family you are looking for by adding a township<br>when one is not actually listed on the page, so much the better.<br></blockquote>
<div> </div>
<div> </div>
<div>Richard, If I was using a deed index and it said the deed between two parties was located in Book 1: 303 and the deed was actually located in Book A: 303, this would make a great deal of difference and definitely waste some time and money. Whether or not this is considered an index, wouldn&#39;t we want it to be a correct index? </div>


<blockquote style="BORDER-LEFT: #ccc 1px solid; MARGIN: 0px 0px 0px 0.8ex; PADDING-LEFT: 1ex" class="gmail_quote"> </blockquote>
<blockquote style="BORDER-LEFT: #ccc 1px solid; MARGIN: 0px 0px 0px 0.8ex; PADDING-LEFT: 1ex" class="gmail_quote"><br>And Michael, while I am never too astonished by what I see some<br>&quot;genealogists&quot; do, I would presume that ALL professionals would create their<br>

citations from the actual images and NEVER rely on what is in the indexes<br>they use to find those images.<br></blockquote>
<div> </div>
<div>I would presume the same, but not everyone on this list is a professional genealogist, so maybe this thread will help others correctly cite their sources.</div>
<blockquote style="BORDER-LEFT: #ccc 1px solid; MARGIN: 0px 0px 0px 0.8ex; PADDING-LEFT: 1ex" class="gmail_quote"><br>Rondina</blockquote></div>