<div>Obviously, awareness of the GPS drops off sharply among beginners and hobbyists.&nbsp; But again, speaking from my Minnesota perespective, we have a cadre of genealogical educators that talk about evidence, analysis and the GPS is almost every talk they give.&nbsp; Our rank and file genealogists have been exposed to the most important concepts.&nbsp; Does it always sink in?&nbsp; Of course not.&nbsp; But, the solution is not professionals talking to professionals, it is professionals mixing with and talking to the broader genealogical community.&nbsp; I think we are doing a good job of that in Minnesota.</div>


<div>&nbsp;</div>


<div>Jay Fonkert, CG</div>


<div>Saint Paul, MN<br>
<br>
<br>
-----Original Message-----<br>
From: hhsh@earthlink.net<br>
To: Barbara Mathews &lt;bmathews@gis.net&gt;; apgpubliclist@apgen.org<br>
Sent: Fri, Oct 2, 2009 2:41 pm<br>
Subject: Re: [APG Public List] Who Are We, Really?<br>
<br>
</div>


<div id=AOLMsgPart_0_2d1cacec-760b-4c1d-ae02-e4de03270fd9 style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; MARGIN: 0px; COLOR: #000; FONT-FAMILY: Tahoma, Verdana, Arial, Sans-Serif; BACKGROUND-COLOR: #fff"><PRE style="FONT-SIZE: 9pt"><TT>&gt; where are
&gt; we as a "profession" if the Genealogical Proof Standard isn't even widely
&gt; accepted or even known? That underlying common stringent methodology for
&gt; evaluation and thesis-testing is missing from the repertoire of many
&gt; conference attendees.

Thank you for putting up a lightning rod, Barbara! This is a great question. My 
worm's-eye view is that most professionals know the GPS, and most non-
professionals don't. The phrase never appears in the state and regional 
periodicals I follow, and only occasionally does the content of the periodicals 
suggest that anything like it is in use.

The comparisons we use -- cross-stitch on one hand, history/anthropology on the 
other -- may not be exact enough. Genealogy, unlike most academic disciplines, 
will always be an activity with a huge base of self-educated do-it-yourselfers. 
The question is, how much can the top-level expertise percolate down? 

Some other disciplines may resemble genealogy a bit in this respect. Astronomy 
is or has been an area where amateurs sometimes do function quasi-
professionally. Others may have better examples of "popular" disciplines that 
face unending challenges and opportunities in raising the standard of grass-
roots practice. Perhaps (I really don't know) we can learn something from them.

Harold



Harold Henderson
Research and Writing from Northwest Indiana
<A href="mailto:hhsh@earthlink.net">hhsh@earthlink.net</A>
home office 219/324-2620
<A href="http://www.midwestroots.net/" target=_blank>http://www.midwestroots.net</A>
<A href="http://midwesternmicrohistory.blogspot.com/" target=_blank>http://midwesternmicrohistory.blogspot.com</A>

_______________________________________________
APG Public Mailing List
<A href="http://apgen.org/publications/publiclist/" target=_blank>http://apgen.org/publications/publiclist/</A>
</TT></PRE></div>
<!-- end of AOLMsgPart_0_2d1cacec-760b-4c1d-ae02-e4de03270fd9 -->