<div>This thread and the concurrent "Who are we?" thread have at times confused two questions: 1) the content/subject matter of talks, and 2) the presentation format (lecture v. forum and discussion).&nbsp; Just a few observations from my vantage point...</div>


<div>&nbsp;</div>


<div>- There clearly is room for a broad range of subject matter in a national conference program -- both lectures about how to find and use records and presentations that illustrate research and problem-solving methodology.&nbsp; Personally, I'd like to see a bit more of the latter.</div>


<div>&nbsp;</div>


<div>- Programs indeed need to appeal to all levels of experience, beginners to advanced professionals.&nbsp; It strikes me that it isn't easy to figure out where the boundaries are between beginner, intermediate and advanced.</div>


<div>&nbsp;</div>


<div>- Basic education is an important part of national conferences, but national conferences are not the primary educational resource for most genealogists and family history researchers.&nbsp; Most genealogical education occurs at state and local levels.&nbsp; At least in MInnesota, I can attest that local and state societies offer classes on things like census research, immigration and land records that are the equal of many talks I've heard at national conferences.&nbsp; On the other hand, national conferences are uniquely situated to offer more specialized educational topics such as offered by people like Claire Bettag and Valerie Melchior.</div>


<div>&nbsp;</div>


<div>This is not to say that such topics should not be on national programs.&nbsp; They by all means should be.&nbsp; From what I'm told, national conferences draw a significant part of their attendance from people of all experience levels&nbsp;living within driving range of the site.&nbsp; But, I would like to see more presentations based on research and problem-solving.&nbsp; And, I would enjoy some of the speaker-audience interaction that others have advocated.</div>


<div>&nbsp;</div>


<div>I'm sure we don't all agree, which is why putting together conference programs -- both nationally and locally -- is a very difficult task.</div>


<div>&nbsp;</div>


<div>Jay Fonkert, CG</div>


<div>Saint Paul, MN</div>


<div>President, Minnesota Genealogical Society<br>
<br>
</div>