I've only been to a handful of national conferences, but I've perused the program of several others over the past 4-5 years.&nbsp; From what I see on the programs, it would appear to me the conferences are of a quite different nature than academic or professional conferences it other fields.&nbsp; The national genealogy conference programs do seem geared toward reporting research or new developments.&nbsp; Rather, the programs seem to have the same core cluster of topics year after year (not a terrible thing, necessarily, as the conferences move around to different regional audiences).&nbsp; The programs are heavy on instructional topics (record types, methodology, technology&nbsp;-- again not inappropriate), but do not seem geared toward talks that report research or developments.&nbsp; Personally, I would like to see more research-based talks that demonstrate problem-solving techniques.&nbsp; I can read about census records or passenger records on my own, but I'd like to hear about how people solve interesting problems.<br>
<br>
<br>
-----Original Message-----<br>
From: DonnDevine@aol.com<br>
To: apgpubliclist@apgen.org<br>
Sent: Thu, Oct 1, 2009 10:19 pm<br>
Subject: [APG Public List] National Genealogical Meetings<br>
<br>


<div id=AOLMsgPart_3_0b7ece3f-3890-4bcf-b980-c08be9d97ebd>

<div>I just received an invitation from a large professional organization in another discipline to submit an abstract&nbsp;for a&nbsp;possible presentation at its March 2010 national meeting. The lead time is four to five months, depending on the subject matter, with the applicable cutoff dates&nbsp;set by the committees responsible for different portions of the program.</div>


<div>&nbsp;</div>


<div>Our national genealogical organizations have submission deadlines&nbsp;up to 14 months in advance of the meetings, with the result that there is little or no opportunity for recent developments and discoveries to&nbsp;be considered for&nbsp;the program.</div>


<div>&nbsp;</div>


<div>In most professions&nbsp;where research plays an important role, national conferences are the means by which practitioners stay on the cutting edge.&nbsp;Conference presentation usually precedes publication in peer-reviewed journals. However, in genealogy the very early&nbsp;conference proposal&nbsp;deadlines give print journals a clear edge on timely reporting of new findings.</div>


<div>&nbsp;</div>


<div>Can anyone explain why genealogy is so different from other scholarly disciplines? Are presenters&nbsp;unable to&nbsp;propose&nbsp;recent discoveries&nbsp;because of the early deadlines? Or do conference planners&nbsp;even look for&nbsp;previously unpublished&nbsp;research&nbsp;findings and&nbsp;breakthroughs, like&nbsp;more effective methodologies, discovery of old errors, or use of novel sources?</div>


<div>&nbsp;</div>


<div><FONT lang=0 face=Arial size=2>Donn Devine, CG, CGL<br>
Wilmington DE <br>
<br>
CG, Certified Genealogist, CGL, and Certified Genealogical&nbsp;Lecturer are service marks of the Board for Certification of Genealogists, used under license by board certificants after periodic evaluation, and the board name is registered in the US Patent &amp; Trademark Office.</FONT></div>
</div>
<!-- end of AOLMsgPart_3_0b7ece3f-3890-4bcf-b980-c08be9d97ebd -->

<div id=AOLMsgPart_4_0b7ece3f-3890-4bcf-b980-c08be9d97ebd style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; MARGIN: 0px; COLOR: #000; FONT-FAMILY: Tahoma, Verdana, Arial, Sans-Serif; BACKGROUND-COLOR: #fff"><PRE style="FONT-SIZE: 9pt"><TT>_______________________________________________
APG Public Mailing List
<A href="http://apgen.org/publications/publiclist/" target=_blank>http://apgen.org/publications/publiclist/</A>
</TT></PRE></div>
<!-- end of AOLMsgPart_4_0b7ece3f-3890-4bcf-b980-c08be9d97ebd -->