<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML><HEAD>
<META HTTP-EQUIV="Content-Type" CONTENT="text/html; charset=us-ascii">
<TITLE>Message</TITLE>

<META content="MSHTML 6.00.6000.16890" name=GENERATOR></HEAD>
<BODY>
<DIV><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: #000000; FONT-FAMILY: Verdana"><SPAN 
class=550443520-02102009><FONT face=Arial color=#0000ff 
size=3>&nbsp;&gt;&gt;&nbsp;</FONT></SPAN>Analysis can be taught, but it is 
exceedingly difficult in the typical one hour lecture format.<SPAN 
class=550443520-02102009><FONT face=Arial color=#0000ff 
size=3>&nbsp;&lt;&lt;</FONT></SPAN></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: #000000; FONT-FAMILY: Verdana"><SPAN 
class=550443520-02102009></SPAN></SPAN>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: #000000; FONT-FAMILY: Verdana"><SPAN 
class=550443520-02102009><FONT face=Arial color=#0000ff size=3>You're right, 
Jack.&nbsp; Looking at examples&nbsp;being displayed and listening to the 
lecturer's points makes it all seem neat and fit nicely into the puzzle.&nbsp; 
Such classes are helpful and provide guidelines, but it takes some 
nosing-in-the-dust to make some of those calls and to develop a sense of 
genealogical analytical thinking.</FONT>&nbsp;</SPAN></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial color=#0000ff size=3></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=550443520-02102009><FONT face=Arial color=#0000ff size=3>Wanda 
Samek</FONT></SPAN></DIV></SPAN></BODY></HTML>