<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">
<html>
<head>
</head>
<body bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#000000">
<font face="Trebuchet MS">In case some folks are interested in a
summary of responses to the question posed, 19 September 2009.<br>
<br>
The question: " </font><font face="Trebuchet MS">If a potential client
wants to locate
an
old buddy or a former girlfriend or neighbor (*<b>kinship not involved*</b>),
would you consider <b>*that search to be what a professional
genealogist
does?</b>* I have my own opinion, but want to hear your consensus."<br>
<br>
</font>There were many useful comments focused on background issues
that
might arise in connection with such a search, but did not weigh in on
the question.<br>
<br>
<font face="Trebuchet MS">Responses to the specific question:<br>
1) Not this one.</font><br>
2) I wouldn't.<br>
3) I wouldn't consider a "missing persons" case to be what a
professional genealogist does.<br>
4) Clearly finding someone without regard to their relationship is not
core to what a professional genealogist does.<br>
5) While we may have the skill sets I don't see it as a genealogy issue.<br>
6) Searching for people in general, with no information regarding the
relationship (kinship) is not valid genealogically.<br>
7) I really think my role is to search for ancestors.<br>
<br>
My own opinion is that while a professional genealogist probably has
the skill sets to conduct a search for an individual *unrelated* to the
client, I would not consider the service to be genealogical in nature
because of the lack of *kinship.*<br>
<br>
Thanks to everyone for an enlightening discussion overall.<br>
<br>
Kathy<br>
APG Member<br>
Charlotte, North Carolina<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
</body>
</html>