I have done cases for a law firm to find remaindermen beneficiaries who were unrelated individuals. I had nothing but a name and a 45 year old address to work with. This is basically a &quot;missing persons&quot; issue. I think genealogists do this sort of work, but it is up to each of us to decide if that is what we as individuals want to do. Personally, I would do it for a law firm, but not for an unknown private individual. I haven&#39;t done adoption research but many genealogists do. I think that we need to be careful when defining what genealogists do, vs. what we personally feel comfortable doing.<div>
<br></div><div>Cathi Desmarais</div><div>Stone House Historical Research</div><div>Vermont</div><div><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Sat, Sep 19, 2009 at 10:01 PM, James Burnett <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:dougb81042@gmail.com">dougb81042@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;"> Finally, here is my question. If a potential client wants to locate an old<br>
&gt; buddy or a former girlfriend or neighbor (kinship not involved), would you<br>
&gt; consider that search to be what a professional genealogist does? I have my own<br>
&gt; opinion, but want to hear your consensus.<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; Kathy<br>
&gt; Charlotte, North Carolina<br>
&gt;<br><br>This seems to me to be more of *missing persons* issue and while we may have the skill sets I don&#39;t see it as a genealogy issue.<br>Douglas Burnett<br>Satellite Beach<br>FL<br>
<br>_______________________________________________<br>
APG Public Mailing List<br>
<a href="http://apgen.org/publications/publiclist/" target="_blank">http://apgen.org/publications/publiclist/</a><br>
<br></blockquote></div><br></div>