I am finding this to a fascinating discussion, and it really highlights the need our field has for definitions and ethical standards.  Does NGS or APG have any position statements on any of these issues? (I will take a look at the websites.) I think it would be valuable to try to hash out some draft standards, perhaps on the private list. The value lies in the discussion and sharing of experiences. With the rise in forensic genealogy and genealogists specializing in adoption searches, and the increasing availability of information on the internet, it is a timely topic.<div>
Cathi Desmarais</div><div><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Sun, Sep 20, 2009 at 11:26 AM, LBoswell <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:laboswell@rogers.com">laboswell@rogers.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
Any ethical researcher doing adoption related searches already takes these<br>
kinds of issues into account.  It would be simply wrong for any number of<br>
reasons to pass information directly to the client without safeguards.  The<br>
researcher&#39;s position in these cases should be to act in the fashion of an<br>
intermediary rather than simply passing on name/address to the client.<br>
Prior permission requested first from the person that the researcher has<br>
found is a given.<br>
<br>
Larry<br>
<div><div></div><div class="h5"><br></div></div></blockquote></div></div>