<div>Carolyn &amp; Jay,</div>
<div> </div>
<div>My experience has been to *question* whether he had a middle name. When I was a manuscript reader for EE, I had a little discussion with a special someone about whether including something about this was worthy of being in the book. Oh, yes indeedy! ESM taught me many, many things--some of which I still remember. One of them is to *not* assume that this didn&#39;t occur with some frequency in other times, as well as our own.</div>


<div> </div>
<div>One of the tools that I have used during the past few months to track a family is to do due diligence to the supposed middle names of the subject&#39;s children. These unproven middle names match perfectly with the children&#39;s middle initials that were consistently used on documents. I always search for those other names, especially in this particular case because they do refer to allied or collateral families.</div>


<div> </div>
<div>This is both sides of the coin.</div>
<div> </div>
<div>Rondina<br clear="all">________________________<br>Rondina P. Muncy<br>Ancestral Analysis<br>2960 Trail Lake Drive<br>Grapevine, Texas 76051<br>817.481.5902<br><a href="mailto:rondina.muncy@gmail.com">rondina.muncy@gmail.com</a><br>

<a href="http://www.ancestralanalysis.com">www.ancestralanalysis.com</a><br><br><br></div>
<div class="gmail_quote">On Thu, Aug 27, 2009 at 12:09 PM, Carolyn Earle Billingsley <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:cebillingsley@earthlink.net">cebillingsley@earthlink.net</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote style="BORDER-LEFT: #ccc 1px solid; MARGIN: 0px 0px 0px 0.8ex; PADDING-LEFT: 1ex" class="gmail_quote">
<div text="#666600" bgcolor="#ffffff">Jay, in my experience, which is, of course, not all inclusive, my opinion is that he did, indeed, HAVE a middle name, which may even have been a female forebearer&#39;s surname. <br>

<br>He may also have used the initial to differentiate himself from another person with his first name. <br><br>But I do not think _all_ he had was an initial for a middle name, although he used it that way.<br><br>I&#39;d also like to know what his _first_ name was, as some given names are paired together--such as William Asbury, Martin Luther, George Washington, Finish Leech, Oliver Hazard Perry, Marcus Aurelius, etc. Regards, Carolyn<br>

<br>Carolyn Earle Billingsley, Ph.D.<br>Member APG, Lone Star Chapter<br><a href="http://www.cebillingsley.net/" target="_blank">www.cebillingsley.net</a><br><br><a href="mailto:jfonkert@aol.com" target="_blank">jfonkert@aol.com</a> wrote: 
<blockquote type="cite">
<div>Good morning to all.  I am working on a man who lived in Kentucky from about 1795-1825, probably born about 1777.  Throughout this Kentucky period, he was consistently known with the middle initial &quot;C.&quot;   A full middle name is never spelled out.  Can anyone tell me, is it likely that &quot;C.&quot; stood for a middle given name?  Or might it have just been an initial?</div>


<div> </div>
<div>  
<div><font lang="2" size="2" face="Arial">Jay Fonkert, CG<br><a href="http://fourgenerationsgenealogy.blogspot.com/" target="_blank"></a></font></div></div></blockquote></div><br>_______________________________________________<br>

APG Public Mailing List<br><a href="http://apgen.org/publications/publiclist/" target="_blank">http://apgen.org/publications/publiclist/</a><br><br></blockquote></div><br>