<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">
<html>
<head>
  <meta content="text/html;charset=ISO-8859-1" http-equiv="Content-Type">
</head>
<body bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#666600">
Jay, in my experience, which is, of course, not all inclusive, my
opinion is that he did, indeed, HAVE a middle name, which may even have
been a female forebearer's surname. <br>
<br>
He may also have used the initial to differentiate himself from another
person with his first name. <br>
<br>
But I do not think _all_ he had was an initial for a middle name,
although he used it that way.<br>
<br>
I'd also like to know what his _first_ name was, as some given names
are paired together--such as William Asbury, Martin Luther, George
Washington, Finish Leech, Oliver Hazard Perry, Marcus Aurelius, etc.
Regards, Carolyn<br>
<br>
Carolyn Earle Billingsley, Ph.D.<br>
Member APG, Lone Star Chapter<br>
<a class="moz-txt-link-abbreviated" href="http://www.cebillingsley.net">www.cebillingsley.net</a><br>
<br>
<a class="moz-txt-link-abbreviated" href="mailto:jfonkert@aol.com">jfonkert@aol.com</a> wrote:
<blockquote
 cite="mid:8CBF53D5BABDC44-2018-9855@webmail-d051.sysops.aol.com"
 type="cite">
  <div>Good morning to all.&nbsp; I am working on a man who lived in
Kentucky from about 1795-1825, probably born about 1777.&nbsp; Throughout
this Kentucky period, he was consistently known with the middle initial
"C."&nbsp;&nbsp; A full middle name is never spelled out.&nbsp; Can anyone tell me, is
it likely that "C." stood for a middle given name?&nbsp; Or might it have
just been an initial?</div>
  <div>&nbsp;</div>
  <div>&nbsp;
  <div><font face="Arial" lang="2" size="2">Jay Fonkert, CG<br>
  <a moz-do-not-send="true"
 href="http://fourgenerationsgenealogy.blogspot.com/" target="_blank"></a></font></div>
  </div>
</blockquote>
</body>
</html>