[APG Public List] [APG Members] Library Of Congress Image

Jeanette Daniels jeanettedaniels8667 at yahoo.com
Thu Feb 3 22:56:35 MST 2011


Angela,

I agree that these men were teamsters, wearing Confederate uniforms, in Union territory in Virginia.  

Thanks,

Jeanette

--- On Thu, 2/3/11, angelaw859 at aol.com <angelaw859 at aol.com> wrote:

From: angelaw859 at aol.com <angelaw859 at aol.com>
Subject: Re: [APG Members] Library Of Congress Image
To: apgmembersonlylist at apgen.org
Date: Thursday, February 3, 2011, 10:49 PM





http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/list/081_cwaf5.html




The statement on the Library of Congress page (scroll down to the thumbnail near the bottom of the page the caption reads:



"Negro Teamsters" (title on print). Title from Milhollen and Mugridge: "Bermuda Hundred, Va. African-American teamsters near the signal tower." Seven black men standing in front of wagon, wood structures in background. (Same image, published as a stereograph with caption "A Group of 'Contrabands,'" found in LOT 4172-A (Stereograph File) -- see entry above.) 

Reproduction number: LC-DIG-cwpb-02004 (b&w copy scan of glass negative)

Call number: LC-B811-2594A (glass negative); LOT 4172-B (photographic print)














-----Original Message-----

From: Jeanette Daniels <jeanettedaniels8667 at yahoo.com>

To: angelaw859 <angelaw859 at aol.com>; APG Members Only List <apgmembersonlylist at apgen.org>; apgpubliclist <apgpubliclist at apgen.org>

Sent: Thu, Feb 3, 2011 7:45 pm

Subject: Re: [APG Members] National Archives in Washington, D.C - preliminary inventory - 3 questions
















Everyone,



Angela sent me a link to the website where she found the picture that I had
 sent.  NOTE:  I was not able to find it with the LOC number on the Library of Congress website.  If you will notice, that this picture was listed under African Americans in Military Camps and Sites
of Military Activity - not Contraband, etc.



The link is:   http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/list/081_cwaf5.html




The definition of contraband was "(during the American Civil War) a
 black slave who escaped to or was brought within the Union lines," according to www.dictionary.com 



In this case, there is no way to know whether these men "escaped" or if they were actually prisoners of war.  I wish we had a date for this picture.  If it was 1865 in Virginia, these men could have easily surrendered.  There is no way to know if these men were "contrabands"---refugee slaves who found sanctuary behind Union lines, as Angela thought.  They definitely are not dressed like slaves. 




Anyway, they are in Confederate "uniforms" - not very good ones and well worn.  



The website states, "Note: In many cases, it is not possible to determine from available 
information under what circumstances African Americans were present in 
these situations.  In some cases, the individuals appear to be servants 
or other laborers; in other cases, they may be refugees or soldiers who 
were not identified as such."



Thanks, Angela for sharing this information.  I appreciate the website link and believe others will as well.



Jeanette Daniels



--- On Thu, 2/3/11, angelaw859 at aol.com <angelaw859 at aol.com>
 wrote:



From: angelaw859 at aol.com <angelaw859 at aol.com>

Subject: Re: [APG Members] National Archives in Washington, D.C - preliminary inventory - 3 questions

To: jeanettedaniels8667 at yahoo.com,
 apgmembersonlylist at apgen.org, apgpubliclist at apgen.org

Date: Thursday, February 3, 2011, 9:46 PM




Not at all.  The same people (when you read the history of the Louisiana Native Guards) were in both!  BUT-----do not rely on my word, nor my opinion.  








The historical records and the official records are most important, and there is no need to fight the Civil War here, for we are researchers who rely on documentation.















-----Original Message-----


From: Jeanette Daniels <jeanettedaniels8667 at yahoo.com>


To: angelaw859 <angelaw859 at aol.com>; APG Members Only List <apgmembersonlylist at apgen.org>; apgpubliclist <apgpubliclist at apgen.org>


Sent: Thu, Feb 3, 2011 6:42 pm


Subject: Re: [APG Members] National Archives in Washington, D.C - preliminary inventory - 3 questions















Angela,





I think you may have missed the fine print at the top of your link:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1st_Louisiana_Native_Guard_%28CSA%29





There were two different Louisiana Native Guards - one Union and one Confederate.





Jeanette Daniels


Heritage Genealogical College





--- On Thu, 2/3/11, angelaw859 at aol.com <angelaw859 at aol.com> wrote:





From: angelaw859 at aol.com <angelaw859 at aol.com>


Subject: Re: [APG Members] National Archives in Washington, D.C - preliminary inventory - 3 questions


To: jeanettedaniels8667 at yahoo.com, michael.hait at hotmail.com, apgmembersonlylist at apgen.org


Date: Thursday, February 3, 2011, 9:20 PM











The Louisiana Native Guards were the first black UNION regiments.









http://www2.netdoor.com/~jgh/















http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1st_Louisiana_Native_Guard















http://www.coax.net/people/lwf/GUARD.HTM















http://www.frenchcreoles.com/military%20achievements/Louisiana%20Native%20Guards/louisiana%20native%20guards.htm















But don't take my word, nor my links. 















The Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies in the War of the Rebellion,  should be useful.















The history of the Louisiana Native Guards has been WELL documented and several Louisiana Native Guards historians are well endorsed by the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities, Port Hudson Historic Site and dozens of other fact based historical organizations.















We, as genealogists base our work on primary sources and not on personal "doubts" about any specific group.  















Angela Walton-Raji





usctchronicle.blogspot.com












-----Original Message-----



From: Jeanette Daniels <jeanettedaniels8667 at yahoo.com>



To: Michael Hait <michael.hait at hotmail.com>; APG Members Only List <apgmembersonlylist at apgen.org>



Sent: Thu, Feb 3, 2011 12:32 pm



Subject: Re: [APG Members] National Archives in Washington, D.C - preliminary inventory - 3 questions


















Michael,







Hopefully the picture I sent to you will show up soon on the APG members site soon.  For some odd reason, anything I send that has attachments has to be reviewed first by the APG monitor.  Anyway, there are a few Internet sites that discuss black Confederate troops.  Many of these troops were in the war from the beginning as man servants to their owners.  That is why it is important to search the local militia records for the area where someone lived or where he joined to find out what was happening in regards to blacks in the Confederacy or in the North.  







The bulk of black Confederate troops served from the beginning.  I know nothing about these Louisiana Native Guard joining the Northern troops.  I highly doubt that.  These men were free blacks who served from the beginning of the war because
 they had just as much to lose as their white Southern friends and neighbors.  Louisiana was one of the best places a free black could live in the South.  







There is one site about a reunion at Gettysburg where the planners failed to provide any tents for black Confederates because they didn't realize how many of them existed.  When they showed up, white Southerners gladly shared their tents with them.  There are also pictures of these old black Confederates at that reunion on the web.  The South gave pensions to them as well as the whites who fought for them.







Jeanette Daniels



Heritage Genealogical College  







--- On Thu, 2/3/11, Michael Hait <michael.hait at hotmail.com> wrote:







From: Michael Hait <michael.hait at hotmail.com>



Subject: Re: [APG Members] National Archives in
 Washington, D.C - preliminary inventory - 3 questions



To: "Jeanette Daniels" <jeanettedaniels8667 at yahoo.com>



Date: Thursday, February 3, 2011, 3:16 PM





















Thank you for that photo, and for the complementary post on the APG list. 
Is this photo available online? This is a subject that I would like to 






 






I 
did not mean to say that there were no black Confederates. Obviously, even the 
state governments recognized the existence of this, as black veterans were 
granted Confederate pensions in quite a few states, including Mississippi, 
Georgia, and Tennessee.






 






However, 
these were not “officially” mustered into the service. The Louisiana Native 
Guard, if I am not mistaken, was a state militia regiment, but was not allowed 
to be officially incorporated into the Confederate Army. If I recall correctly, 
didn’t they eventually join the U. S. Colored Troops, later in the 
War?







Michael 
Hait



michael.hait at hotmail.com



http://www.haitfamilyresearch.com














 










From: Jeanette Daniels 






Sent: Thursday, February 03, 2011 5:04 PM






To: Michael Hait 






Subject: Re: [APG Members] National Archives in Washington, D.C - 
preliminary inventory - 3 questions












 











  
  
    Not sure if this picture will show up.  I will attach 
      it as well.







Jeanette Daniels



Heritage Genealogical 
      College








      






      













--- On Thu, 2/3/11, 
      Michael Hait <michael.hait at hotmail.com> wrote:




      



From: 
        Michael Hait <michael.hait at hotmail.com>



Subject: Re: [APG 
        Members] National Archives in Washington, D.C - preliminary inventory - 
        3 questions



To: "Ruth Randall" <aitchpe54 at msn.com>, 
        lmatkins at cox.net, transitional-genealogists-forum-l at rootsweb.com, 
        "APGMembers Only List" <apgmembersonlylist at apgen.org>



Date: 
        Thursday, February 3, 2011, 2:30 PM








        



        #yiv2091996945 #yiv2091996945AOLMsgPart_1_6c8c3bdb-ba93-4f83-8b02-9e365626dc8e td{color:black;}#yiv2091996945 #yiv2091996945AOLMsgPart_1_6c8c3bdb-ba93-4f83-8b02-9e365626dc8e      #yiv2091996945AOLMsgPart_1_e1b7c1b1-ba78-4837-8072-6f7c37153e0a td{color:black;}#yiv2091996945 #yiv2091996945AOLMsgPart_1_6c8c3bdb-ba93-4f83-8b02-9e365626dc8e      #yiv2091996945AOLMsgPart_1_e1b7c1b1-ba78-4837-8072-6f7c37153e0a  #yiv2091996945AOLMsgPart_1_2d0cbcba-cc04-4815-907c-d5e00b151d3d td{color:black;}#yiv2091996945 #yiv2091996945AOLMsgPart_1_6c8c3bdb-ba93-4f83-8b02-9e365626dc8e      #yiv2091996945AOLMsgPart_1_e1b7c1b1-ba78-4837-8072-6f7c37153e0a  #yiv2091996945AOLMsgPart_1_2d0cbcba-cc04-4815-907c-d5e00b151d3d   .yiv2091996945hmmessage p {margin:0px;padding:0px;}#yiv2091996945 #yiv2091996945AOLMsgPart_1_6c8c3bdb-ba93-4f83-8b02-9e365626dc8e      #yiv2091996945AOLMsgPart_1_e1b7c1b1-ba78-4837-8072-6f7c37153e0a 
 #yiv2091996945AOLMsgPart_1_2d0cbcba-cc04-4815-907c-d5e00b151d3d   .yiv2091996945hmmessage {font-size:10pt;font-family:tahoma;}

        



        



        


None 
        of the U. S. Colored Troops were Confederate soldiers. LeRoy is not 
        looking at Confederate records. The Adjutant General’s Office had 
        dominion over the Bureau of Colored Troops, which was created by the 
        Enrollment Act of 1863. The Bureau controlled all U. S. Colored 
        Troops.



        


 



        


On a side note: While there were black men (generally slaves) that 
        served for the Confederate Army, they were not mustered into Confederate 
        service. The Confederacy only passed the act allowing black soldiers in 
        April 1865, and we all know how long the War last after that. ... 
        ;)



        


 



        


To clarify a little about General Order 329. This was the order 
        *within the War Department* that allowed for the specific creation of 
        “Slave Claims Commissions”—originally called “Boards of Claims”—for the 
        four slave-holding Union states: Maryland, Missouri, Delaware, and 
        Kentucky. Only in Maryland was a Board set up immediately in 1863. The 
        other Commissions were established later, including one for Tennessee 
        and one for West Virginia. This Order (329) was issued as a result of a 
        clause in the Enrollment Act of 1863 that specified that loyal 
        slaveowners would be compensated by the federal government for any of 
        their slaves that joined the Union.



        


 



        


The 
        papers for the accepted Claims are held as enclosures within the 
        compiled military service records. These are also available on 
        Ancestry.com among their U. S. Colored Troops Service Records images. 
        The claims papers offer evidence of the owner’s loyalty, evidence of 
        ownership of the slave, etc. These are not abstracts like the carded 
        records, but the original papers submitted to the Commissions.



        


 



        


An 
        index/abstract of the claims of several regiments of the U. S. C. T. is 
        available on the St. Louis County Library website. I have published the 
        claims for Delaware and Kentucky, using the original claims registers at 
        NARA.







Michael 
        Hait



michael.hait at hotmail.com



http://www.haitfamilyresearch.com



        



        



        


 



        



        


From: Ruth Randall 



        


Sent: Thursday, February 03, 2011 4:11 PM



        


To: wlmailhtml:/mc/compose?to=lmatkins at cox.net 
        ; wlmailhtml:/mc/compose?to=transitional-genealogists-forum-l at rootsweb.com 
        ; APGMembers Only List 
        



        


Subject: Re: [APG Members] National Archives in Washington, 
        D.C - preliminary inventory - 3 questions









        


 






        


Dear Le Roy,



 



Have you looked for 
        your subject in Ancestry.com's US Civil War Records and Profiles?  
        If your subject is included on that site, it will incude his date of 
        enlistment, and, state served and his date of birth.  Ancestry's 
        Index of Civl War Pension Index includes the claimant's Company and 
        Regiment and his applicagtion and certificate 
        numbers.



 



Pllease do not assume that a member of the US 
        Colored Troops who ws a resident of Missouiri was necessarily a member 
        of the Confederacy. The Adjutant General  of the War Department 
        issued General Order No. 329 on 3 October 1863 which provided for the 
        slaveowners in Missouri, Maryland (Confederate states that did not 
        secede from the Union) and Tennessee (which was by then under the 
        control of the Union) to offer their slaves for enlistment.  
        Slaveholders were to be compensated a maximum of $300 for the service or 
        labor of a slave.  







Regards,



Ruth Randall 
        









































 




























 






















 








      
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