[APG Public List] Citing a manuscript

Catherine Desmarais stonehouseresearch at gmail.com
Sat Nov 27 08:28:29 MST 2010


Thank you very much for your response. I love how much I learn from this
list. The search and replace function will get a workout in a few of my
documents-in-process.

Knowing that a new edition of CMOS was due out this past August, I held off
on buying the old one. The new edition is on my Christmas list. Reading
Elizabeth's interesting comparisons, I can see that having more than one
edition is helpful. Maybe I'll get a good deal on a used book, and build up
my reference library some more.

Thank you for your input.

Cathi Desmarais



On Sat, Nov 27, 2010 at 10:19 AM, <eshown at comcast.net> wrote:

> Cathi wrote:
>
> > Since "c1850s-1911" includes an abbreviation for "circa," does the
> abbreviation not require a period? I usually use ca., and I presume that ca.
> and c. are interchangeable, but I thought both required a period.
>
>
>
>
>
> Cathi, cataloging titles, in citing approximated dates, frequently use the
> format I followed for the approximated date span. For example, the Library
> of Congress catalogs Peter Lund’s collection of printed music this way:
>
>
>
> “Peter Lund, Jr. collection c1850-1950 (bulk 1900-1950).”
>
>
>
> Normally, when abbreviations appear in narrative sentences, we are indeed
> still expected to put periods after abbreviations (Dr., Mr., etc.).
>
>
>
>
>
> >I believe that it is preferable to use traditional abbreviations for the
> names of states, rather than the postal codes, but where do we find the
> most acceptable abbreviations? I have been using "Penn." for Pennsylvania,
> but I notice that Elizabeth uses "Pa." Are these abbreviations standardized
> somewhere? Or are several different forms acceptable, such as Pa. and Penn.?
>
> CMOS (16th ed.) 10.28 provides the standard abbreviations.  For
> Pennsylvania, that is “Pa.”
>
> Those who debate using postal codes versus standard abbreviations are
> winning the longstanding war (even though I haven’t yet yielded :). CMOS’s
> 14th edition (1993) decried the use of postal codes in anything except a
> mailing address. CMOS’s 15th (2003) accepted them on more-or-less a par
> with standard abbreviations. Now CMOS 16th (2010) says that the University
> of Chicago Press (which is what CMOS was designed to guide) prefers the
> postal codes.
>
> However, there is an important caveat: Postal codes and state-name
> abbreviations are to be used in tabular matter, reference notes, mailing
> addresses, etc. Amid narrative text, state names (like month names) are to
> be spelled out.
>
> Elizabeth
>
>
>
> Elizabeth Shown Mills, CG, CGL, FASG
> The Evidence Series
>
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