[APG Public List] APGPublicList Digest, Vol 8, Issue 19

Deena Butta dbutta at glenviewpl.org
Fri Jun 25 12:12:11 MDT 2010


The scary thing about this "scam" is that it comes through the email address of someone you know and trust.  It happens because their email account has somehow become compromised.  One day my friend was unable to get into her email account; and soon after, people began to receive emails FROM THAT ACCOUNT that sounded as if they really did come from her. How realistic is it that our friends would actually assk for help in this manner if truly stranded in a foreign country?  Important to keep your head in this situation.

--deena

-----Original Message-----
From: apgpubliclist-bounces+dbutta=glenviewpl.org at apgen.org [mailto:apgpubliclist-bounces+dbutta=glenviewpl.org at apgen.org] On Behalf Of apgpubliclist-request at apgen.org
Sent: Friday, June 25, 2010 12:32 PM
To: apgpubliclist at apgen.org
Subject: APGPublicList Digest, Vol 8, Issue 19

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Today's Topics:

   1. Re: [APG Members] SCAM: My Predicament!!!!        (NeedHelp). (Amy Crow)
   2. Re: [APG Members] SCAM: My        Predicament!!!! (NeedHelp).
      (fzsaund at ix.netcom.com)
   3. Re: [APG Members] SCAM: My        Predicament!!!!(NeedHelp). (LBoswell)
   4. Re: [APG Members] My Predicament!!!! (Need Help). (LBoswell)
   5. British Institute - October 4-8 - Salt Lake City (Kathy Hinckley)
   6. Re: [APG Members] My Predicament!!!! (Need Help). (Terry Reigel)
   7. Re: [APG Members] My Predicament!!!! (Need Help). (LBoswell)
   8. Re: My Predicament!!!! (Need Help). (Terry Reigel)
   9. Re: [APG Members] My Predicament!!!! (Need Help). (Jack Butler)
  10. Re: [APG Members] friend of a friend (LBoswell)
  11. Re: [APG Members] friend of a friend (Terry Reigel)
  12. Re: [APG Members] My Predicament!!!! (Need Help). (LBoswell)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Message: 1
Date: Fri, 25 Jun 2010 11:01:48 -0400
From: Amy Crow <amy at amyjohnsoncrow.com>
Subject: Re: [APG Public List] [APG Members] SCAM: My Predicament!!!!
        (NeedHelp).
To: Mail list APG <apgpubliclist at apgen.org>
Message-ID: <B0DD2F9A-8C60-4AF9-8C45-CADE7DB2FF19 at amyjohnsoncrow.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

> This idea that 'friends of friends' wired money sounds like a classic urban legend.  Usually phrased in the manner "some friends of friends" did it, or saw it, or it happened to them.  When you go looking to see who these people were, it's like trying to drive to the horizon,  it keeps advancing in front of you through a continuous chain of new 'friends of friends'.  And you never reach an actual person who fell for it.


I can personally vouch for one person who was a breath away from falling for this scam. My elderly aunt received a similar email from her "grandson." She went to her local grocery store to wire the money. Fortunately, the clerk thought the whole thing sounded like a scam and asked my aunt if she had tried calling her grandson. She said no, she hadn't, because the email said that he was in a foreign country, etc etc. The clerk kindly suggested that she try calling him anyway. She did and discovered the whole thing was a hoax. If it hadn't been for the heads-up action of the clerk, my aunt would have been out several hundred dollars.

It's important for us to remember that just because we're savvy to these sorts of things, not everyone who uses email is. (And it doesn't necessarily have to be an elderly person falling for it, either. I've seen plenty of bonehead decisions by members of the supposedly tech-savvy generation.) Just because someone uses email does not automatically mean that (1) they're savvy about it and (2) they're immune to social engineering scams. (Social engineering scams defined by Online Cyber Safety as "a scam that preys upon our acceptance of authority and willingness to cooperate with others.")

> they keep doing it simply because it's easy to do.  Not because it succeeds.  Someone somewhere lives in hope of finding a dupe.  I guess it keeps them busy.  I imagine the return on their efforts is very small.

I don't agree with the statement that "...the return on their efforts is very small." These emails are sent out by the thousands in a very small amount of time. Let's say it takes 30 minutes to send out 10,000 such emails (it's likely much less time than that, but let's be over-cautious with our estimate). If just 1% of those recipients respond, that's 100 respondents. If each one sends just $100, that's $10,000 the scammer made in 30 minutes -- not a bad hourly rate, if you ask me. If there isn't money in it, they wouldn't be doing it.

Amy Johnson Crow, CG



------------------------------

Message: 2
Date: Fri, 25 Jun 2010 11:11:14 -0400 (EDT)
From: fzsaund at ix.netcom.com
Subject: Re: [APG Public List] [APG Members] SCAM: My   Predicament!!!!
        (NeedHelp).
To: apgpubliclist at apgen.org, apgmembersonlylist at apgen.org
Message-ID:
        <17380598.1277478675099.JavaMail.root at elwamui-karabash.atl.sa.earthlink.net>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8

The couple that I have seen from genealogical acquaintances were both done on free e-mail accounts that they do not have a computer of their own, but have to access their e-mail through a public computer at their local library.

Rick Saunders




------------------------------

Message: 3
Date: Fri, 25 Jun 2010 11:48:36 -0400
From: "LBoswell" <laboswell at rogers.com>
Subject: Re: [APG Public List] [APG Members] SCAM: My
        Predicament!!!!(NeedHelp).
To: "Amy Crow" <amy at amyjohnsoncrow.com>,        "Mail list APG"
        <apgpubliclist at apgen.org>
Message-ID: <8382428CFAAC4CCB830699F8AA40C463 at acer511eba12df>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"

Yes, the elderly are prone to such things, though not as often by email (simply because the vast majority aren't as active on the internet as other age groups).  They more often are victims of the telephone frauds.  There's a handful that fall for the mail or telephone versions every year in this city for example.  My elderly mother has her carpets cleaned far too often (even with my efforts to monitor things) that we could all eat off of them.
Her memory span isn't very long. These scams are more targeted at the elderly, or new immigrants (but that latter group are prone to a particularly vicious type of scam).
.
Friends of friends I don't think included elderly aunts.  Someone should be monitoring the email account of any elderly person who could be easily duped though.  Setting up mail rules that work using a coded word in the body of the email for example.

There are many other reasons why these scams are sent out. You can't imagine how many millions go out.  Some of them are simply looking to see if they've hit a valid address or not.  In some cases opening the email will allow the sender to know that a valid account has been found.  Could be targets then for more subtle activities that lead to your pc becoming infected by some worm or virus.

More danger of people falling for the Paypal message to verify your account, or the message from your internet provider asking you to verify accts, I suppose.  Though I think if someone was foolish enough to provide personal data by email, then the responsibility falls on their shoulders...


Larry
  ----- Original Message -----
  From: Amy Crow
  To: Mail list APG
  Sent: Friday, June 25, 2010 11:01 AM
  Subject: Re: [APG Public List] [APG Members] SCAM: My Predicament!!!!(NeedHelp).


  > This idea that 'friends of friends' wired money sounds like a classic urban legend.  Usually phrased in the manner "some friends of friends" did it, or saw it, or it happened to them.  When you go looking to see who these people were, it's like trying to drive to the horizon,  it keeps advancing in front of you through a continuous chain of new 'friends of friends'.  And you never reach an actual person who fell for it.


  I can personally vouch for one person who was a breath away from falling for this scam. My elderly aunt received a similar email from her "grandson."
She went to her local grocery store to wire the money. Fortunately, the clerk thought the whole thing sounded like a scam and asked my aunt if she had tried calling her grandson. She said no, she hadn't, because the email said that he was in a foreign country, etc etc. The clerk kindly suggested that she try calling him anyway. She did and discovered the whole thing was a hoax. If it hadn't been for the heads-up action of the clerk, my aunt would have been out several hundred dollars.

  It's important for us to remember that just because we're savvy to these sorts of things, not everyone who uses email is. (And it doesn't necessarily have to be an elderly person falling for it, either. I've seen plenty of bonehead decisions by members of the supposedly tech-savvy generation.) Just because someone uses email does not automatically mean that (1) they're savvy about it and (2) they're immune to social engineering scams. (Social engineering scams defined by Online Cyber Safety as "a scam that preys upon our acceptance of authority and willingness to cooperate with others.")

  > they keep doing it simply because it's easy to do.  Not because it succeeds.  Someone somewhere lives in hope of finding a dupe.  I guess it keeps them busy.  I imagine the return on their efforts is very small.

  I don't agree with the statement that "...the return on their efforts is very small." These emails are sent out by the thousands in a very small amount of time. Let's say it takes 30 minutes to send out 10,000 such emails (it's likely much less time than that, but let's be over-cautious with our estimate). If just 1% of those recipients respond, that's 100 respondents.
If each one sends just $100, that's $10,000 the scammer made in 30 minutes -- not a bad hourly rate, if you ask me. If there isn't money in it, they wouldn't be doing it.

  Amy Johnson Crow, CG
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Message: 4
Date: Fri, 25 Jun 2010 12:02:15 -0400
From: "LBoswell" <laboswell at rogers.com>
Subject: Re: [APG Public List] [APG Members] My Predicament!!!! (Need
        Help).
To: "Terry Reigel" <terry at reigelridge.com>,     "apgpubliclist"
        <apgpubliclist at apgen.org>
Message-ID: <FAE142A06DC14896A009393D7824311A at acer511eba12df>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"

That make sense, I don't use free email accounts.  In this case maybe they were too free!  Or freely available.

People get careless with their passwords and usernames, and who can blame them.  For genealogical purposes alone I have over 200 username/passwords.
But each one is unique, and composed of a mix of uppercase, lowercase and numerals.  I record the answer to my security questions on the same file card that has the password and username, never leaving it on the website in question.  And I make up my own unique security question (not just 'mother's maiden name').  I never leave my computer set to automatically log in to a site (which parks a cookie containing that information on your pc).

It's the responsibility of each person to make sure they're secure.  If you leave your door unlocked, you can't complain if someone opens the door and walks in.

The good thing is that it's pointless to keep changing your passwords.
Absolutely not necessary unless you know for sure that you've been hacked.
No need to change your bank password every so many months. Hackers don't operate like that.

with dozens and dozens of these things, who could keep updating them anyway?

play by the same rules you'd use in real life, and you won't be as vulnerable on the web.

But again Terry, it's that old Urban Legend chant someone told me "a friend of hers did...."  Ye olde 'friend of a friend" again.

Larry
  ----- Original Message -----
  From: Terry Reigel
  To: apgpubliclist
  Sent: Friday, June 25, 2010 10:55 AM
  Subject: Re: [APG Public List] [APG Members] My Predicament!!!! (Need Help).


  LBoswell wrote:
  > It's more likely from third party applications accessed
  > through FB.  Privacy settings that you have set for FB
  > may not apply when you use those other apps.

  While the same scam is being run on Facebook, best I can see in those cases it's actually done on the Facebook system, not via email. All the messages of this sort I've received were emails, and seem to have two things in common -- use of a "free" email account, and a computer user who seems to be relatively unaware of security issues. In each of those cases the email account was actually taken over by the intruder. And, few if any of them every figure out how their account was compromised. I suspect they have either fallen for a phishing message and voluntarily given up their passwords, or have used weak passwords or security questions that make it easier for the scammers to break into the accounts. One told me he used the security question "What was your first phone number?" and not remembering it, entered 1234567890, and believed that was the way the account was compromised.

  > I just don't think people would actually
  > fall for this little con.

  Oh but they do - that's why it's going on. A correspondent whose account was compromised for one of these told me one of her friends did indeed send the money.

  Terry Reigel
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Message: 5
Date: Fri, 25 Jun 2010 10:18:11 -0600
From: "Kathy Hinckley" <hinckleyk at comcast.net>
Subject: [APG Public List] British Institute - October 4-8 - Salt Lake
        City
To: "'apgpubliclist'" <apgpubliclist at apgen.org>
Message-ID: <01dc01cb1482$02588210$07098630$@net>
Content-Type: text/plain;       charset="us-ascii"

The following message is from Ann Wells, Director of the 2010 ISBGFH British
Institute:

Time goes by so quickly and it is hard to believe that the British Institute (BI), an educational opportunity through the International Society for British Genealogy and Family History (ISBGFH), is celebrating ten years!

Over the past ten years, we've had a number of excellent instructors and this year is certainly no exception. Instructors this year will be Barbara Baker, AG; David Rencher, AG, CG, FIGRS, FUGA and Darris Williams, AG.

This year's BI will be held in Salt Lake City from Monday, 4 October through Friday, 8 October 2010 with Barbara Baker teaching Pre-1800 Scottish Research. This class will help you find those pre 1800 records and will also explore lesser known records in an attempt to help you break down your brick walls.

David Rencher will be leading the course Making the Transition from Irish Church Records to Irish Land Records. This course will help you to glean the most from the available church records and use the clues found there to identify the lands of your ancestors.

Strategies for Discovering Welsh Ancestors will be taught by Darris Williams. This course will highlight methods for solving research questions that make Welsh family history difficult.

Please note that all classes are intended to be small, so space is limited.
Early registration ends 1 July. For more information about the courses or the instructors, see the society's Website  http://www.isbgfh.org



------------------------------

Message: 6
Date: Fri, 25 Jun 2010 12:41:15 -0400
From: Terry Reigel <terry at reigelridge.com>
Subject: Re: [APG Public List] [APG Members] My Predicament!!!! (Need
        Help).
To: apgpubliclist <apgpubliclist at apgen.org>
Message-ID: <2010625124115.310071 at Terry>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"

LBoswell wrote:

> But again Terry, it's that old Urban Legend chant someone told me "a
> friend of hers did...."  Ye olde 'friend of a friend" again.

Larry,

So you are saying that my correspondent lied to me when she said one of the other people to whom the email was sent did send money? On what basis do you make that accusation?


Terry Reigel



------------------------------

Message: 7
Date: Fri, 25 Jun 2010 13:08:15 -0400
From: "LBoswell" <laboswell at rogers.com>
Subject: Re: [APG Public List] [APG Members] My Predicament!!!! (Need
        Help).
To: "Terry Reigel" <terry at reigelridge.com>,     "apgpubliclist"
        <apgpubliclist at apgen.org>
Message-ID: <6A57DAD6C76841618CCD4D209D797914 at acer511eba12df>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"

Terry, that's hardly worthy of an answer (suggesting Accusations and Lies).
But sure, on the basis that 'friend of a friend' is how urban legends spread.

it was your correspondent's friend.  Correspondent is equivalent to the first generation friend in that urban legend phrase.  Her friend thus becomes 'friend of a friend'.  End of story, all I was saying.

But as genealogists we're all wary of the equivalent "friend of a friend told me" when doing oral interviews (substitute kinship terms).  It's like believing family gossip without hearing it from the actual person.

Still batting zero here on people being actually duped.


Larry

  ----- Original Message -----
  From: Terry Reigel
  To: apgpubliclist
  Sent: Friday, June 25, 2010 12:41 PM
  Subject: Re: [APG Public List] [APG Members] My Predicament!!!! (Need Help).


  LBoswell wrote:

  > But again Terry, it's that old Urban Legend chant someone
  > told me "a friend of hers did...."  Ye olde 'friend of a
  > friend" again.

  Larry,

  So you are saying that my correspondent lied to me when she said one of the other people to whom the email was sent did send money? On what basis do you make that accusation?


  Terry Reigel
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Message: 8
Date: Fri, 25 Jun 2010 13:13:01 -0400
From: Terry Reigel <terry at reigelridge.com>
Subject: Re: [APG Public List] My Predicament!!!! (Need Help).
To: apgpubliclist <apgpubliclist at apgen.org>
Message-ID: <201062513131.378113 at Terry>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"

LBoswell wrote:
> Still batting zero here on people being actually duped.

Larry,

As long as you are going to dismiss real evidence, make up your own reality, and impute those who disagree with you, you are not really adding anything useful to the conversation.

Terry


------------------------------

Message: 9
Date: Fri, 25 Jun 2010 13:15:50 -0400
From: "Jack Butler" <jackbutler at shwgenealogy.com>
Subject: Re: [APG Public List] [APG Members] My Predicament!!!! (Need
        Help).
To: "apgpubliclist" <apgpubliclist at apgen.org>
Message-ID: <3E0746C3042A4052A0BE184F90D768F9 at JackPC>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"

Larry wrote:

"It's the responsibility of each person to make sure they're secure.  If you leave your door unlocked, you can't complain if someone opens the door and walks in."

I concur totally with the first sentence and find the 2nd totally nonsensical. During daylight hours, my door is routinely unlocked. The idea that I am inviting strangers into my house and that I have no complaint should one enter is ridiculous. It has never happened, but I assure you that any stranger walking through that unlocked door without invitation would most certainly be met with complaint and might quite possibly be met with overt hostility.

Likewise, the fact that I might inadvertently leave some crack in my computer security (I don't particularly believe that I do) is not equivalent to giving tacit permission for some jerk to go poking about the innards of my system. The error, or even carelessness of a computer user does not excuse or justify someone else's bad behavior.

Jack Butler

  ----- Original Message -----
  From: LBoswell
  To: Terry Reigel ; apgpubliclist
  Sent: Friday, June 25, 2010 12:02 PM
  Subject: Re: [APG Public List] [APG Members] My Predicament!!!! (Need Help).


  That make sense, I don't use free email accounts.  In this case maybe they were too free!  Or freely available.

  People get careless with their passwords and usernames, and who can blame them.  For genealogical purposes alone I have over 200 username/passwords.  But each one is unique, and composed of a mix of uppercase, lowercase and numerals.  I record the answer to my security questions on the same file card that has the password and username, never leaving it on the website in question.  And I make up my own unique security question (not just 'mother's maiden name').  I never leave my computer set to automatically log in to a site (which parks a cookie containing that information on your pc).

  It's the responsibility of each person to make sure they're secure.  If you leave your door unlocked, you can't complain if someone opens the door and walks in.

  The good thing is that it's pointless to keep changing your passwords.  Absolutely not necessary unless you know for sure that you've been hacked.  No need to change your bank password every so many months. Hackers don't operate like that.

  with dozens and dozens of these things, who could keep updating them anyway?

  play by the same rules you'd use in real life, and you won't be as vulnerable on the web.

  But again Terry, it's that old Urban Legend chant someone told me "a friend of hers did...."  Ye olde 'friend of a friend" again.

  Larry
    ----- Original Message -----
    From: Terry Reigel
    To: apgpubliclist
    Sent: Friday, June 25, 2010 10:55 AM
    Subject: Re: [APG Public List] [APG Members] My Predicament!!!! (Need Help).


    LBoswell wrote:
    > It's more likely from third party applications accessed
    > through FB.  Privacy settings that you have set for FB
    > may not apply when you use those other apps.

    While the same scam is being run on Facebook, best I can see in those cases it's actually done on the Facebook system, not via email. All the messages of this sort I've received were emails, and seem to have two things in common -- use of a "free" email account, and a computer user who seems to be relatively unaware of security issues. In each of those cases the email account was actually taken over by the intruder. And, few if any of them every figure out how their account was compromised. I suspect they have either fallen for a phishing message and voluntarily given up their passwords, or have used weak passwords or security questions that make it easier for the scammers to break into the accounts. One told me he used the security question "What was your first phone number?" and not remembering it, entered 1234567890, and believed that was the way the account was compromised.

    > I just don't think people would actually
    > fall for this little con.

    Oh but they do - that's why it's going on. A correspondent whose account was compromised for one of these told me one of her friends did indeed send the money.

    Terry Reigel
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Message: 10
Date: Fri, 25 Jun 2010 13:24:25 -0400
From: "LBoswell" <laboswell at rogers.com>
Subject: Re: [APG Public List] [APG Members] friend of a friend
To: "LBoswell" <laboswell at rogers.com>, "Terry Reigel"
        <terry at reigelridge.com>,        "apgpubliclist" <apgpubliclist at apgen.org>
Message-ID: <58950AF1017141D6A5FCD9CC5D42E448 at acer511eba12df>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"

This is actually often true in oral interviews, that people will abbreviate information, and shorten the distance between themselves and the source (generationally speaking).  It's human nature, not intentionally lying.
It's good story telling.

http://people.howstuffworks.com/urban-legend2.htm

But any good interviewer knows how to get around this kind of thing, and begin to prove or disprove it.

Note that sometimes it will be friend saying "friend of a friend of mine".
Other times they'll simply drop one generation making it "friend of mine".
As the article says it's not lying, it's just wanting to be closer to the story, a near participant.  Or sometimes because the friend believes it happened to someone else, it becomes "it happened to me", dropping two links in the chain.

And then chances are it will remain "friend of a friend".  I bet someone on the list will say "a friend of a guy on the APG list" sent money (dropping one of the generations).

as I said, it's one of the pitfalls any interviewer has to watch out for (grandparents become the source when they actually heard it from their grandparents, and so on)

Larry
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Message: 11
Date: Fri, 25 Jun 2010 13:31:13 -0400
From: Terry Reigel <terry at reigelridge.com>
Subject: Re: [APG Public List] [APG Members] friend of a friend
To: apgpubliclist <apgpubliclist at apgen.org>
Message-ID: <2010625133113.831527 at Terry>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"

LBoswell wrote:

> I bet someone on the list will say "a friend of a guy on the APG list"
> sent money (dropping one of the generations).

Larry,

So, if I get you right, I told you that I was in direct conversation with one of the two principals involved. I asked about how it happened, and she volunteered that one of the people who received the email did indeed send money, and they were trying (unsuccessfully, I suspect) to stop the transaction. And you say that there has still not been an actual case known where a victim sent money. I don't know any other way to understand your position other than you are saying that I am lying, or my correspondent was lying. Tell me another explanation for your position.

Terry


------------------------------

Message: 12
Date: Fri, 25 Jun 2010 13:32:53 -0400
From: "LBoswell" <laboswell at rogers.com>
Subject: Re: [APG Public List] [APG Members] My Predicament!!!! (Need
        Help).
To: "Jack Butler" <jackbutler at shwgenealogy.com>,        "apgpubliclist"
        <apgpubliclist at apgen.org>
Message-ID: <A897C864B6AE456697BDF1DAC33A7E43 at acer511eba12df>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"

Well Jack, wouldn't want to leave it unlocked around here (and this isn't exactly a high crime area).  And in some areas, it's preferred that someone is found to be home!

And on unlocking or carelessness,   I inadvertently left the trunk on my car
unlocked (slightly ajar) last week.  I can hardly complain when it was rifled.  It was "entered" in the middle of the night (I think).  Spilled things around, but not much there worth stealing, so no damage to me.  Not very bright thieves as they could have flipped down the rear seats and gained access to more valuable stuff in the glove box in the main compartment, so I got off lightly.

I think your reply is interesting though I believe people on the internet need to be far more careful because unlike my rather poor analogy, you'll never *see* them enter (hack, or leave a worm or trojan on)  your pc.  But it will be because you left "a door open" in your internet security.  Most of these things are automatic, not directly controlled. Phishing for information.  Notice a lot of spam doesn't have your email address.  Just viewing it can trigger notice that a valid email address has been found.

Sorry, responsibility lies first with those who don't take precautions, who aren't protecting themselves. It's why some municipalities charge people who leave their car doors unlocked.

Larry
  ----- Original Message -----
  From: Jack Butler
  To: apgpubliclist
  Sent: Friday, June 25, 2010 1:15 PM
  Subject: Re: [APG Public List] [APG Members] My Predicament!!!! (Need Help).


  Larry wrote:

  "It's the responsibility of each person to make sure they're secure.  If you leave your door unlocked, you can't complain if someone opens the door and walks in."

  I concur totally with the first sentence and find the 2nd totally nonsensical. During daylight hours, my door is routinely unlocked. The idea that I am inviting strangers into my house and that I have no complaint should one enter is ridiculous. It has never happened, but I assure you that any stranger walking through that unlocked door without invitation would most certainly be met with complaint and might quite possibly be met with overt hostility.

  Likewise, the fact that I might inadvertently leave some crack in my computer security (I don't particularly believe that I do) is not equivalent to giving tacit permission for some jerk to go poking about the innards of my system. The error, or even carelessness of a computer user does not excuse or justify someone else's bad behavior.

  Jack Butler

    ----- Original Message -----
    From: LBoswell
    To: Terry Reigel ; apgpubliclist
    Sent: Friday, June 25, 2010 12:02 PM
    Subject: Re: [APG Public List] [APG Members] My Predicament!!!! (Need Help).


    That make sense, I don't use free email accounts.  In this case maybe
they were too free!  Or freely available.

    People get careless with their passwords and usernames, and who can
blame them.  For genealogical purposes alone I have over 200
username/passwords.  But each one is unique, and composed of a mix of
uppercase, lowercase and numerals.  I record the answer to my security
questions on the same file card that has the password and username, never
leaving it on the website in question.  And I make up my own unique security
question (not just 'mother's maiden name').  I never leave my computer set
to automatically log in to a site (which parks a cookie containing that
information on your pc).

    It's the responsibility of each person to make sure they're secure.  If
you leave your door unlocked, you can't complain if someone opens the door
and walks in.

    The good thing is that it's pointless to keep changing your passwords.
Absolutely not necessary unless you know for sure that you've been hacked.
No need to change your bank password every so many months. Hackers don't
operate like that.

    with dozens and dozens of these things, who could keep updating them
anyway?

    play by the same rules you'd use in real life, and you won't be as
vulnerable on the web.

    But again Terry, it's that old Urban Legend chant someone told me "a
friend of hers did...."  Ye olde 'friend of a friend" again.

    Larry
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Terry Reigel
      To: apgpubliclist
      Sent: Friday, June 25, 2010 10:55 AM
      Subject: Re: [APG Public List] [APG Members] My Predicament!!!! (Need
Help).


      LBoswell wrote:
      > It's more likely from third party applications accessed
      > through FB.  Privacy settings that you have set for FB
      > may not apply when you use those other apps.

      While the same scam is being run on Facebook, best I can see in those
cases it's actually done on the Facebook system, not via email. All the
messages of this sort I've received were emails, and seem to have two things
in common -- use of a "free" email account, and a computer user who seems to
be relatively unaware of security issues. In each of those cases the email
account was actually taken over by the intruder. And, few if any of them
every figure out how their account was compromised. I suspect they have
either fallen for a phishing message and voluntarily given up their
passwords, or have used weak passwords or security questions that make it
easier for the scammers to break into the accounts. One told me he used the
security question "What was your first phone number?" and not remembering
it, entered 1234567890, and believed that was the way the account was
compromised.

      > I just don't think people would actually
      > fall for this little con.

      Oh but they do - that's why it's going on. A correspondent whose
account was compromised for one of these told me one of her friends did
indeed send the money.

      Terry Reigel
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